Are you Suffering from any of these symptoms as a result of Tinnitus? Free 15 Min Consultation.

    Mild to severe anxiety
    Insomnia
    Triggered fight or flight

  Depression
  Negative thinking
  Crying spells

  Hopelessness
  Suicidal thoughts
  Ringing in the ears

    Do you feel your family and friends don’t understand?
    Are you growing more isolated?
    Do you feel like life will never be the same?
    Are you refraining from activities that you enjoy?
    Are you fearful of losing your job?
    Do you find that your thoughts tend to be negative?

If you answered yes to 3 or more of these questions or symptoms, then we can help.
You may be a candidate for Tinnitus Cognitive Retraining Therapy, or TCRT.  Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R, with over 20 years of clinical experience, a New York University graduate, developed Tinnitus Cognitive Retraining Therapy and founded Tinnitus Cognitive Center in response to the growing number of Tinnitus sufferers coming to his private practice. He discovered that by helping people to retrain and reinterpret the thoughts around their Tinnitus, anxiety and depression symptoms began to improve. But even more important so did the Tinnitus.

Call us at (646) 213-2321 for a FREE consultation.


See our main site: www.tinnituscognitivecenter.com
Blog Posts are Below:


Monthly Archives: February 2015

Cause of Tinnitus in Children

Tinnitus Occurs Frequently Among Children

 

Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R, a leading Manhattan tinnitus treatment psychotherapist, frequently treats children who are experiencing tinnitus, a condition that results in a ringing or roaring noise in the ears. The incidence of tinnitus is the same in childhood as in adults. As many as a third of children experience tinnitus at some time, and one in twelve children may have clinically significant problems that interfere with concentration or sleep.

 

If Your Child Has Tinnitus

If your child complains of ringing, buzzing, or roaring sounds in the ear, the first step is often an appointment with the family doctor or pediatrician. When the disorder is persistent, a specialist in treatment of ear diseases should evaluate the child. Treatment often requires the help of a specially trained tinnitus treatment psychotherapist like Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R. Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R can assist your child with management of tinnitus using effective psychotherapy for tinnitus treatment.

Children tinnitus

What Are The Causes of Tinnitus in Children?

The causes of tinnitus in children are the same as the causes of tinnitus in adults. Damage to the ear can result in interruption of sound signals to the brain, and the brain may compensate by generating signals that result in the sensation of ringing or roaring in the ear.

 

Hearing loss in children is a common cause of tinnitus. Deaf children are frequently troubled with tinnitus, and intervention by a specialist in treatment of ENT disorders will help your child minimize the effects of this disorder on activities like schoolwork or sleep. Children who acquire hearing loss after birth are at greater risk of developing tinnitus than children who are born deaf.

 

Ear infections and sinus infections can result in hearing loss and tinnitus. A child with persistent ear or sinus infections should visit an ENT doctor to determine the best course of treatment. Some children may have tinnitus as a result of ear discharge caused by an infection.

 

Earwax can build up and result in hearing loss and tinnitus. It’s important for an ENT doctor to evaluate your child so that any potentially treatable conditions can be addressed.

 

Any damage to the ear can result in tinnitus, including damage from infection, trauma, or drugs, including certain classes of antibiotics and aspirin or drugs like ibuprofen (NSAIDs).

 

Because tinnitus can also be the result of a brain tumor or an aneurysm, it is essential to have your child diagnosed by an ENT doctor. Treatment of underlying causes can be helpful.

 

Second hand smoke and exposure to loud noises have both been implicated in development of tinnitus. Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R will discuss your child’s health history with you to help determine the cause of the tinnitus.

 

Treatment For Your Child’s Tinnitus

There is not one specific treatment for tinnitus, and it may be a long-term condition. Because tinnitus can result in difficulties with sleep and daytime activities, it can lead to frustration and even behavioral problems in children. Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R is an experienced tinnitus treatment psychotherapist in Manhattan, and can help you determine how to minimize the psychological distress your child may be experiencing as a result of tinnitus.

 

Helping your child develop adaptive responses can sometimes significantly reduce tinnitus in children. Because children have growing brains, this type of treatment can result in improvement over time. If your child has a hearing impairment, a hearing aid can take away the focus on internal noise, by allowing your child to hear sounds that they may not normally be able to hear. Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R sometimes suggests some type of sound therapy, which may include a white noise machine to distract the child from the tinnitus. If your child is having difficulty sleeping, Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R can advise you on the best strategies to help control this problem.

 

Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R Treats Young Patients With Tinnitus

At our clinic, we often see young patients affected by tinnitus. Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R has experience in diagnosis and treatment of this condition. If you child is distracted and distressed by tinnitus, call Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R today for a consultation. Call 646-213-2321.

Top Causes of Tinnitus

One of the most common causes of tinnitus is inner ear cell damage. Tiny, fine hairs in your inner ear oscillate in relation to pressure of sound wave pressure. This causes cells to signal auditory nerves to your brain. The brain then reads these signals as sound. If the hairs inside your inner ear are damaged, they can emit random electrical signals to your brain and trigger tinnitus.

Other causes of tinnitus include other auditory problems, certain chronic health problems, brain injuries and injuries or conditions that have an impact on the nerves in your ear or the hearing brain center.

Common causes of tinnitus

Causes of tinnitusIn many people, tinnitus is caused by one of these conditions:

  •  Cumulative exposure to loud sounds. As stated earlier, loud sounds, such as from certain equipment, gunshot and artillery, power saws, are common causes of hearing loss. Portable music devices, used with ear buds, headphones or loudspeakers, can also cause hearing loss if played at high volumes for long periods of time. Listening to loud music with unprotected ears in bars, clubs or amplified music from concerts or shows, or listening to music from home loud speakers can also cause tinnitus. Tinnitus following short-term exposure, going to a loud club or concert, will in most cases be a short-term consequence. Long-term sound exposure can cause more long-term damage.
  • Hearing loss. For many of us hearing worsens as we get older, with the onset being around age 60. Reduced hearing capacity can also cause tinnitus.
  •  Earwax.  Your ear canal is shielded by earwax which traps dirt and slows the growth of bacteria. A buildup of too much earwax may cause hearing loss or irritation to the eardrum, which can also lead to temporary tinnitus, easily remedied by removing the earwax blockage.
  • Ear bone changes. Otosclerosis, or hardening of the middle ear bones, may have a negative impact on hearing, and also trigger tinnitus as well. Otosclerosis, research has shown, tends to be hereditary.
  •  Meniere’s disease. Tinnitus may also be a symptom Meniere’s disease, an inner ear disorder that can also cause vertigo and other symptoms.
  •  TMJ disorders. Jawbone problems at the tempero-mandibular articulation point, where the jawbone meets your skull, can cause tinnitus.
  •  Head injuries or neck injuries. Head traumas, concussions or neck injuries can affect the inner ear, usually causing tinnitus in only one ear.
  •  Acoustic neuroma. Is a non-cancerous benign tumor developing on the cranial nerve that runs from your brain to your inner ear, and controls balance and hearing functions. Also called vestibular schwannoma, this condition generally causes tinnitus in only one ear.

Causes of Tinnitus

  • Dental Work. Dental work can also cause tinnitus. There is also research to indicate that dental fillings containing mercury and other metals are a cause of tinnitus.

 Other rarer causes of tinnitus:

Blood vessel disorders causing tinnitus – Pulsatile tinnitus is a rarer type of tinnitus caused by certain blood vessel problems. Pulsatile tinnitus may be caused by the following:

  •  Head or neck tumors. Pressure on a blood vessel as a result of a tumor in your head or neck, may result in several symptoms including tinnitus.
  •  Atherosclerosis.  An accumulation of cholesterol and other fatty deposits due to the aging process may also cause blood vessels to occlude in both the middle and inner ear resulting in loss of vascular elasticity. As a result, blood flow through the vessels is pumped with more pressure, enabling you to sometimes hear the actual beats. This type of tinnitus is generally experienced in both ears.
  •  High blood pressure. Emotional stress, caffeine and alcohol can aggravate hypertension and increase tinnitus levels.
  •  Turbulent blood flow. Narrowing or partial occlusion of a carotid artery or jugular vein in the neck can cause irregular blood flow and in turn cause tinnitus.
  •  Malformation of capillaries. Tinnitus may also be caused by arteriovenous malformation (AVM), when abnormal connections form between arteries and veins.

This type of tinnitus is primarily found in only one ear.

Monthly Archives: February 2015

Cause of Tinnitus in Children

Tinnitus Occurs Frequently Among Children

 

Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R, a leading Manhattan tinnitus treatment psychotherapist, frequently treats children who are experiencing tinnitus, a condition that results in a ringing or roaring noise in the ears. The incidence of tinnitus is the same in childhood as in adults. As many as a third of children experience tinnitus at some time, and one in twelve children may have clinically significant problems that interfere with concentration or sleep.

 

If Your Child Has Tinnitus

If your child complains of ringing, buzzing, or roaring sounds in the ear, the first step is often an appointment with the family doctor or pediatrician. When the disorder is persistent, a specialist in treatment of ear diseases should evaluate the child. Treatment often requires the help of a specially trained tinnitus treatment psychotherapist like Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R. Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R can assist your child with management of tinnitus using effective psychotherapy for tinnitus treatment.

Children tinnitus

What Are The Causes of Tinnitus in Children?

The causes of tinnitus in children are the same as the causes of tinnitus in adults. Damage to the ear can result in interruption of sound signals to the brain, and the brain may compensate by generating signals that result in the sensation of ringing or roaring in the ear.

 

Hearing loss in children is a common cause of tinnitus. Deaf children are frequently troubled with tinnitus, and intervention by a specialist in treatment of ENT disorders will help your child minimize the effects of this disorder on activities like schoolwork or sleep. Children who acquire hearing loss after birth are at greater risk of developing tinnitus than children who are born deaf.

 

Ear infections and sinus infections can result in hearing loss and tinnitus. A child with persistent ear or sinus infections should visit an ENT doctor to determine the best course of treatment. Some children may have tinnitus as a result of ear discharge caused by an infection.

 

Earwax can build up and result in hearing loss and tinnitus. It’s important for an ENT doctor to evaluate your child so that any potentially treatable conditions can be addressed.

 

Any damage to the ear can result in tinnitus, including damage from infection, trauma, or drugs, including certain classes of antibiotics and aspirin or drugs like ibuprofen (NSAIDs).

 

Because tinnitus can also be the result of a brain tumor or an aneurysm, it is essential to have your child diagnosed by an ENT doctor. Treatment of underlying causes can be helpful.

 

Second hand smoke and exposure to loud noises have both been implicated in development of tinnitus. Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R will discuss your child’s health history with you to help determine the cause of the tinnitus.

 

Treatment For Your Child’s Tinnitus

There is not one specific treatment for tinnitus, and it may be a long-term condition. Because tinnitus can result in difficulties with sleep and daytime activities, it can lead to frustration and even behavioral problems in children. Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R is an experienced tinnitus treatment psychotherapist in Manhattan, and can help you determine how to minimize the psychological distress your child may be experiencing as a result of tinnitus.

 

Helping your child develop adaptive responses can sometimes significantly reduce tinnitus in children. Because children have growing brains, this type of treatment can result in improvement over time. If your child has a hearing impairment, a hearing aid can take away the focus on internal noise, by allowing your child to hear sounds that they may not normally be able to hear. Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R sometimes suggests some type of sound therapy, which may include a white noise machine to distract the child from the tinnitus. If your child is having difficulty sleeping, Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R can advise you on the best strategies to help control this problem.

 

Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R Treats Young Patients With Tinnitus

At our clinic, we often see young patients affected by tinnitus. Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R has experience in diagnosis and treatment of this condition. If you child is distracted and distressed by tinnitus, call Stephen G. Katz, LCSW-R today for a consultation. Call 646-213-2321.

Top Causes of Tinnitus

One of the most common causes of tinnitus is inner ear cell damage. Tiny, fine hairs in your inner ear oscillate in relation to pressure of sound wave pressure. This causes cells to signal auditory nerves to your brain. The brain then reads these signals as sound. If the hairs inside your inner ear are damaged, they can emit random electrical signals to your brain and trigger tinnitus.

Other causes of tinnitus include other auditory problems, certain chronic health problems, brain injuries and injuries or conditions that have an impact on the nerves in your ear or the hearing brain center.

Common causes of tinnitus

Causes of tinnitusIn many people, tinnitus is caused by one of these conditions:

  •  Cumulative exposure to loud sounds. As stated earlier, loud sounds, such as from certain equipment, gunshot and artillery, power saws, are common causes of hearing loss. Portable music devices, used with ear buds, headphones or loudspeakers, can also cause hearing loss if played at high volumes for long periods of time. Listening to loud music with unprotected ears in bars, clubs or amplified music from concerts or shows, or listening to music from home loud speakers can also cause tinnitus. Tinnitus following short-term exposure, going to a loud club or concert, will in most cases be a short-term consequence. Long-term sound exposure can cause more long-term damage.
  • Hearing loss. For many of us hearing worsens as we get older, with the onset being around age 60. Reduced hearing capacity can also cause tinnitus.
  •  Earwax.  Your ear canal is shielded by earwax which traps dirt and slows the growth of bacteria. A buildup of too much earwax may cause hearing loss or irritation to the eardrum, which can also lead to temporary tinnitus, easily remedied by removing the earwax blockage.
  • Ear bone changes. Otosclerosis, or hardening of the middle ear bones, may have a negative impact on hearing, and also trigger tinnitus as well. Otosclerosis, research has shown, tends to be hereditary.
  •  Meniere’s disease. Tinnitus may also be a symptom Meniere’s disease, an inner ear disorder that can also cause vertigo and other symptoms.
  •  TMJ disorders. Jawbone problems at the tempero-mandibular articulation point, where the jawbone meets your skull, can cause tinnitus.
  •  Head injuries or neck injuries. Head traumas, concussions or neck injuries can affect the inner ear, usually causing tinnitus in only one ear.
  •  Acoustic neuroma. Is a non-cancerous benign tumor developing on the cranial nerve that runs from your brain to your inner ear, and controls balance and hearing functions. Also called vestibular schwannoma, this condition generally causes tinnitus in only one ear.

Causes of Tinnitus

  • Dental Work. Dental work can also cause tinnitus. There is also research to indicate that dental fillings containing mercury and other metals are a cause of tinnitus.

 Other rarer causes of tinnitus:

Blood vessel disorders causing tinnitus – Pulsatile tinnitus is a rarer type of tinnitus caused by certain blood vessel problems. Pulsatile tinnitus may be caused by the following:

  •  Head or neck tumors. Pressure on a blood vessel as a result of a tumor in your head or neck, may result in several symptoms including tinnitus.
  •  Atherosclerosis.  An accumulation of cholesterol and other fatty deposits due to the aging process may also cause blood vessels to occlude in both the middle and inner ear resulting in loss of vascular elasticity. As a result, blood flow through the vessels is pumped with more pressure, enabling you to sometimes hear the actual beats. This type of tinnitus is generally experienced in both ears.
  •  High blood pressure. Emotional stress, caffeine and alcohol can aggravate hypertension and increase tinnitus levels.
  •  Turbulent blood flow. Narrowing or partial occlusion of a carotid artery or jugular vein in the neck can cause irregular blood flow and in turn cause tinnitus.
  •  Malformation of capillaries. Tinnitus may also be caused by arteriovenous malformation (AVM), when abnormal connections form between arteries and veins.

This type of tinnitus is primarily found in only one ear.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
19 West 34th Street
Penthouse Floor
New York, NY 10001


Call today for a consultation
646-213-2321