Are you Suffering from any of these symptoms as a result of Tinnitus? Call Today for a Consultation.

    Mild to severe anxiety
    Insomnia
    Triggered fight or flight

  Depression
  Negative thinking
  Crying spells

  Hopelessness
  Suicidal thoughts
  Ringing in the ears

Do you feel your family and friends don’t understand?
Are you growing more isolated?
Do you feel like life will never be the same?
Are you refraining from activities that you enjoy?
Are you fearful of losing your job?
Do you find that your thoughts tend to be negative?

If you answered yes to 3 or more of these questions or symptoms, then we can help.

You may be a candidate for Tinnitus Cognitive Retraining Therapy, or TCRT.  Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R, with over 20 years of clinical experience, a New York University graduate, developed Tinnitus Cognitive Retraining Therapy and founded Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ in response to the growing number of Tinnitus sufferers coming to his private practice. He discovered that by helping people to retrain and reinterpret the thoughts around their Tinnitus, anxiety and depression symptoms began to improve. But even more important so did the Tinnitus.

Call us at (646) 213-2321 for a FREE consultation.


See our main site: www.tinnituscognitivecenter.com
Blog Posts are Below:


Traumatic Causes of Tinnitus

What are some traumatic causes of tinnitus? If you have ever experienced a concussion or a traumatic brain injury, you may have noticed your ears ringing for a few minutes or possibly even longer. For instance, blasts or airbag injuries can cause your ears to ring, make you feel dizzy and even result in hearing loss. Almost anyone can suffer a traumatic brain injury, but older people are more likely to suffer from such events.

In the U.S alone, people aged seventy five and older tend to have the highest number of hospitalizations related to brain injuries. The first thing doctors do after such a situation is stabilize their patients. In most cases, it takes time for patients to notice symptoms and signs of Tinnitus or any other audiological disorder. Sometimes, it even takes days or weeks to notice any tinnitus related symptoms.

Patients often don’t pay attention to the hissing sound or think it is normal, only to realize later that they have Tinnitus. If you have had an accident recently that resulted in brain injuries, you should visit a doctor and get a checkup as soon as possible.

Traumatic Causes of Tinnitus
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Traumatic Injuries and the Link with Tinnitus

TBI is a head trauma that prevents the brain from functioning normally. Most traumatic brain injuries happen because of falls, followed by assaults and car crashes. Any blow, jolt, or bump that causes the brain and head to move back and forth rapidly can cause the brain to twist or bounce inside the skull, resulting in chemical changes.

It can also cause irreversible damage to the cells and result in Tinnitus. It is worth keeping in mind that you don’t necessarily have to get hit directly in the head to get a TBI. Lurching forward at a high pace during a car accident or hitting the brakes too hard can cause brain injuries. Also, you can get a brain injury without losing consciousness, which is quite dangerous as issues like these often go undiagnosed until they get worse.

Doctors often use the term “concussion” to describe a brain injury to parents, as it doesn’t sound too alarming. Still, a concussion is a traumatic brain injury. According to a study, patients aged fourteen or older who went to urban hospitals after suffering from a mild traumatic brain injury were sent home. What makes matters even worse is that these children were not called for a follow up.

Because of this, more than twenty seven percent of the children sent home developed Tinnitus and various cognitive issues that required therapy. If you or someone you know has had an injury like this, ensure a proper checkup.

Auditory Issues Triggered by a Traumatic Injury to the Brain

Here is a list of auditory problems caused by a traumatic brain injury:

  • Tinnitus
  • Hearing loss
  • Loudness intolerance or noise sensitivity
  • Decreased tolerance for particular sounds
  • Aural fullness
  • Auditory processing issues

Traumatic injuries can also result in balance problems, which include:

Most Traumatic Causes of Tinnitus
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Traumatic Causes of Tinnitus: Final Thoughts

Unfortunately, more than fifty percent of people who suffer from traumatic brain injuries develop auditory problems like Tinnitus at some point in their lives. These people often notice phantom sounds like buzzing, ringing, or hissing. If you or someone you know has Tinnitus, make sure to get professional treatment right away.

Stephen Katz Tinnitus Cognitive Center ™ can evaluate tinnitus patients and determine the best treatment. Get in touch with us to book an appointment, and one of our experts will diagnose the root of your condition to formulate a well thought out treatment plan.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

About Stephen Katz

Top Tinnitus Treatments

What are the top tinnitus treatments? While many would think that the ringing they hear in their ears is nothing too serious, that unfortunately may not be the case. This ringing that people hear in their ears is called tinnitus, and it sometimes it is a symptom of a much larger health concern.

Top tinnitus treatments USA UK EURO
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Therefore, even if it does not seem serious, you need to be careful and look for more effective methods to treat it before it worsens with time. Fortunately, professionals have worked on many treatment options for tinnitus, including the symptom itself or the underlying health concern.

What are the Symptoms of Tinnitus?

Tinnitus has very obvious symptoms, but it can also be very personal. Often the ringing that people hear is unique to their ears, and no one else can hear it. It can usually happen when the small hairs in your inner ears undergo damage.

Due to the subjective nature of tinnitus, people can also be hesitant to tell others about what they are experiencing. Luckily, physicians have definitive ways of checking if a person has tinnitus and its severity. And depending on what they find, they will be able to recommend different treatment options.

Treatment Options for Tinnitus

Getting treatment for tinnitus is rarely ever simple, as physicians must first go through the proper process of diagnosing the situation. Therefore, treatment options can vary widely depending on the type of tinnitus a person has and their underlying medical condition. However, some very popular treatment options for tinnitus include the following:

Using Hearing Aids

Individuals who lose their hearing due to old age or loud noises can greatly benefit from hearing aids. These hearing aids can help reduce the ringing resulting from hearing loss.

Removing Ear Wax

The body naturally produces ear wax to protect the opening of the ears from dust and dirt. However, if the ear canal accumulates too much of it, it will likely affect the individual’s ability to hear clearly. Of course, you should only try to remove the wax using a q tip. Instead, it would help if you visited a professional who can safely clean out your ears.

Suppress the Excess Noise

People with tinnitus often face the most difficulty sleeping since there are no external voices to help mask the sound. Therefore, they will need to properly mask their tinnitus sound using various other types of soothing sounds. White noise machines often have various sounds that can help an individual sleep with tinnitus. You can also find unique headphones designed for people to wear when they sleep since they do not hurt the inside of their ears.

Best top tinnitus treatments
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Tinnitus Retraining Therapy

Tinnitus Retraining Therapy (TRT) is one of the most important treatment solutions individuals can get since it focuses on treating tinnitus symptoms through counseling and sound masking techniques. You will likely go to an audiologist specializing in treating conditions like tinnitus.

They will give you a masking device to wear while offering counsel. Not only are they trying to help relieve symptoms in the short term, but they are also helping an individual’s ears block out the noise. The treatment will also help you better manage your feelings when dealing with those symptoms.

Top Tinnitus Treatments: Conclusion

Tinnitus can be a very serious issue for many individuals, as it can greatly affect their lives. But with the right diagnosis and treatment options, people can learn to manage their symptoms and live normal lives again. With more than 20 years of experience of providing Tinnitus Retraining Therapy TRT, Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW R at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ in New York, can surely help you with your condition.

Give us a call for an online consultation today.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

Things That Can Trigger Tinnitus

What are the main things that can trigger tinnitus? Tinnitus is a condition that causes ringing in an individual’s ears. The condition could result from an individual’s age or be a symptom of a more serious health concern. Furthermore, the sounds that people with tinnitus hear do not result from any external sounds.

Things That Can Trigger Tinnitus
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Instead, the noises result from damage to the inner ear’s tiny hairs. These damaged hairs will send a different signal to your brain, essentially controlling how you hear sound. These small hairs can likely be damaged due to injuries, lack of blood circulation, or even old age.

Tinnitus can be a temporary condition, or it could turn into a permanent condition. However, people can be more careful by understanding what causes the ringing in an individual’s ears.

Triggers for Tinnitus

Multiple factors could trigger tinnitus in an individual. Therefore, by understanding each trigger, individuals can avoid certain situations or be more careful. Some of these triggers include:

High Blood Pressure

The first possible trigger for tinnitus could be an individual’s blood pressure issues. More specifically, an individual with high blood pressure could likely have to deal with tinnitus. Furthermore, hardening of the arteries or rising blood pressure in the short term due to stress, nicotine, caffeine, or alcohol can also trigger the condition.

Hen blood vessel close to the inner and middle ear becomes less elastic; your blood flow can be much stronger and seem much louder. This condition is called Pulsatile Tinnitus.

TMJ Issues

TMJ, or the temporomandibular joint, can also lead to tinnitus since the joint connects to the middle ear through multiple nerves and ligaments. One of the major signs of TMJ is the popping sound that most people can hear when chewing.

Sinus and Ear Infection

One of the major reasons that people suffer from temporary tinnitus is because of a sinus or ear infection. People who will often be dealing with the common cold are very likely to hear ringing in their ears until they can recover.

These infections add pressure to the sinus, affecting an individual’s hearing. This type of temporary tinnitus will likely go away within a week as individuals eventually heal from the common cold. However, if you can heal from other common cold symptoms but still struggle with tinnitus, you should visit a physician immediately.

Too Much Earwax

A common reason why people might have tinnitus is that they have too much earwax in their ear canals. The body produces this wax to protect an individual’s ears from dust and dirt. However, people must clean their ears regularly since excess buildup can affect their hearing ability.

If you have too much ear wax built up into your, you should avoid trying to get it out yourself. Instead, visit a professional who will remove the excess gunk very gently.

Common Things That Can Trigger Tinnitus
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Loud Noises

This specific trigger can be especially dangerous for individuals since they cannot control their environment. So far, loud noises are one of the leading causes of tinnitus, and it can usually include various noises such as music, sudden loud bursts, objects clattering, and crashing cars. Engine backfiring can also contribute to tinnitus.

The ringing that people are experiencing could happen in one or both ears, with the damage being temporary or permanent.

Things That Can Trigger Tinnitus: Conclusion

Tinnitus can be a heavy daily burden for those with the condition. Luckily there are effective cognitive tinnitus treatments that can lessen or even cure the condition. Knowing the common triggers can also help manage tinnitus.

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW R at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ in New York, has over 20 years of experience providing excellent Tinnitus Retraining Therapy TRT. Call today for an expert consultation.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

Is There A Relationship Between Tinnitus & Anxiety?

Is there a relationship between tinnitus and anxiety? Anxiety impacts people in different ways. Some experience difficulty sleeping, while others feel uneasy the entire time. Some people also experience ringing in their ears, a condition that experts call tinnitus. People suffering from tinnitus often hear hissing, buzzing, or ringing sounds. The severity of this condition often varies from one individual to the other. However, it can be incredibly disruptive and distracting, affecting the sufferer’s quality of life in more ways than one.

Tinnitus treatments usually vary based on the cause. For instance, experts may suggest stress relieving activities, medications, or even certain therapies, especially for tinnitus caused by anxiety.

Relationship Between Tinnitus & Anxiety?
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Does Anxiety Cause Tinnitus?

Anxiety is the body’s way of responding to stress. People experience stress because of the interplay between their thoughts and physical reactions. Moreover, the American Psychological Association states common anxiety characteristics include anxious thoughts, elevated blood pressure, and tense feelings.

Doctors often link anxiousness to various medical conditions, which include tinnitus. Over forty percent of individuals who suffer from chronic tinnitus have anxiety symptoms. These symptoms often cause tinnitus to worsen. Some of the common sounds tinnitus sufferers notice include:

  • Musical notes
  • Air escaping
  • Sizzling
  • Whistling
  • Hissing
  • Buzzing
  • Fluttering
  • Humming

Tinnitus can be especially disturbing for people who experience it for the first time, causing difficulties focusing and sleeping in some cases. If you experience any symptoms that seem like signs of Tinnitus, you should get in touch with a doctor. There are treatments for this condition so you don’t have to panic.

The Interlinked Relationship of Tinnitus and Anxiety

Tinnitus and anxiety have a linked relationship. In some situations, mental health conditions like anxiety can often result in tinnitus. Worse, tinnitus can elevate anxiety episodes because it makes the individual worry.

About sixty percent of chronic tinnitus sufferers also have depression. So far, there is very little research to prove whether tinnitus occurs before a psychological condition or after, but there is a visible link between tinnitus and psychological distress.

Other Anxiety Symptoms

Individuals who suffer from anxiety have intrusive thoughts that tend to return continuously. Some people even experience physical symptoms like:

  • Nightmares
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Heart palpitations
  • Muscle tension
  • Dry mouth
  • Sweating
  • Headaches
  • Trembling
  • Twitching

Managing Tinnitus

Tinnitus can happen due to various factors, and almost everyone experiences it differently. Therefore, the most appropriate management or treatment options for tinnitus sufferers usually depend on their particular symptoms. Currently, tinnitus doesn’t have a scientifically proven cure. However, certain therapies and treatments can minimize their severity and impact, helping people live comfortably.

Doctors often recommend the following things:

  • Relaxation techniques
  • Hearing aids
  • Sound therapy
  • Anti depressants and other medications

If these things do not work, speaking with a professional therapist or skilled counselor may help people manage their responses and emotions to tinnitus. CBT, also known as cognitive behavioral therapy, has proven to be quite effective in improving tinnitus patients’ quality of life by improving their overall mental health.

Is there Relationship Between Tinnitus & Anxiety?
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Relationship Between Tinnitus & Anxiety: Final Thoughts

Tinnitus can cause many disruptions in your life and become an anchor around your neck if you don’t tackle it. While certain tips can help you get relief at home, it is best to consult a pro, and that’s where tinnitus treatment specialist Stephen Katz can help you. Book an appointment with us, and we will evaluate the severity of your condition and offer a viable solution to alleviate your symptoms.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

How Do I Stop Ringing in the Ears Tinnitus?

If you are suffering from tinnitus, you want to know how to stop the ringing in your ears. Some people often notice their ears ringing at regular intervals, while others may hear a buzzing, roaring, or hissing in their heads. Sometimes the sounds are intermittent, and other times, they can be constant. Issues like these can be a minor or massive distraction, depending on their severity. If you are among the ten percent of people who experience tinnitus, you can alleviate it to some extent.

Stop Ringing in the Ears Tinnitus
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Tinnitus – What Is It?

The condition is referred to as tinnitus when the human ear perceives sound without external sound. The noise is either perceived in both or one ear and, in some cases, in the head. Generally, people with this condition report hearing waves, wind, whooshing, songs, crickets, roaring, whistling, humming, hissing, high pitched ringing, and whatnot in the head.

According to the American Tinnitus Association, over fifty million people in the United States experience this condition to some extent. Out of these fifty million Americans, about twelve million suffer from extreme tinnitus and require medical attention.

What Tinnitus Patients Should do to Minimize or Stop Ringing in the Ears

If you think you suffer from tinnitus, the first thing to do is to notice the details regarding your symptoms. Were you exposed to loud noises, or did you start taking medicine before the ringing started? Are both of your ears affected, or do you have hearing issues? Make sure you consider such questions before opting for any treatment.

Take the time to observe what makes the ringing worse. Some individuals state that certain drugs, drinks, and food often worsen their symptoms. Remember, tinnitus affects everybody differently, so avoid different triggers and maintain a written log. You don’t necessarily have to avoid each trigger, but notice things that impact your symptoms.

Here are some things that may trigger your tinnitus:

  • Salt
  • Aspirin
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeinated drinks like energy drinks, tea, coffee, and cola

Do these Things to Possibly Avoid Ringing in the Ears

If your tinnitus is becoming too much of a problem, consider doing the following things to prevent the ringing sounds in your ears or head.

Avoid Smoking

If you are a regular smoker, consider avoiding it entirely. Smoking can worsen the tinnitus in more ways than one. First off, it affects the blood flow toward your sensitive nerve cells. Secondly, it also acts as a stimulant, causing the ringing to sound even louder.

Soothing Sounds May Help

Sometimes tinnitus can become a bigger bother than it usually is when it is too quiet. You can do the following things to distract your mind from the sounds in your head and ears:

  • Turn your fan on
  • Listen to some light music
  • Listen to a podcast

Some people also report that using a white noise machine can help offset the ringing sounds. These devices can create different soothing sounds, like the sounds of a running stream, rainfall, or ocean waves.

Take some Time Out to Relax

It is normal to get annoyed or anxious when you notice a ringing or buzzing sound in your ears. However, worrying can worsen these symptoms. Consider trying different techniques to calm your mind until you find something that works for you. Sometimes even a few minutes of relaxation can make you feel better significantly.

How to Stop Ringing in the Ears Tinnitus
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Stop Ringing in the Ears Tinnitus: Final Thoughts

Tinnitus can become a massive burden for those suffering from it and can prevent people from going about their day. If you or someone you know experiences ringing in the ears, Stephen Katz may be able to help. Just book an appointment by contacting us. Dr. Katz will diagnose and possibly resolve your issue, ensuring you can go about your day without getting overwhelmed and distracted by ringing in your ears.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

Health Conditions Related to Tinnitus

Are there health conditions related to tinnitus? Despite being lesser known, nearly 50 million Americans are struggling with tinnitus. However, since people sometimes think that a faint ringing in their ear is fine or natural, less than half of those diagnosed will seek out help.

Health conditions related to tinnitus
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More importantly, tinnitus is often not the problem since it is more or less a signal that an underlying health condition needs your attention. To help educate people about the health conditions often related to tinnitus.

Common Types of Tinnitus

While tinnitus refers to the noise or ringing people can hear inside their ears, they often fall into two broader categories. These include subjective tinnitus and objective tinnitus. The main difference between the two is that the subjective category is unique to the individual.

But as for objective tinnitus, a medical expert can hear noise in your ear using devices such as a stethoscope. An audiologist will likely perform the tests necessary to determine which category you have.

Each category can have unique causes, with objective tinnitus often resulting from severe muscle spasms. But as for the subjective type, it is more than likely that subjective tinnitus results from factors like aging or exposure to loud noise.

Health Conditions Related to Tinnitus

Tinnitus is often a sign that an individual has other, more serious health conditions for which they should get treatment. Here is a more detailed list of the medical conditions often related to tinnitus.

Diabetes

People with diabetes are at an increased risk of developing tinnitus for various reasons. People with diabetes will already have trouble with their blood flow, which can make them significantly more susceptible to trouble with their hearing.

Elevated blood sugar levels can also lead to people developing tinnitus symptoms.

Higher Blood Pressure

Higher blood pressure can contribute to people developing tinnitus. Of course, it will still contribute to tinnitus if people have naturally higher blood pressure or are in situations where it is likely to rise.

Other factors that can increase blood pressure, such as caffeine and alcohol, are more than likely to spike blood pressure. And when it does, it is not uncommon for people to hear a ringing in their ears.

Ear Infections

If an individual has an ear infection, they are more than likely to have tinnitus. Since blood flow to the ears is restricted during an ear infection, the inner ear will likely develop tinnitus.

Autoimmune Disorders

Another serious health condition related to tinnitus is an autoimmune disease known as lupus. People struggling with autoimmune diseases will eventually lead to peripheral auditory dysfunction, which can lead to hearing a noise in their ears.

Health conditions related to tinnitus | TRT Treatment
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Hearing Loss

People who lose their hearing, whether due to old age or an accident, are most likely to develop tinnitus. The only treatment to deal with this condition is for the individual to get hearing aids to reduce tinnitus symptoms.

Sinus and the Common Cold

Along with various other conditions, tinnitus could signify that the individual has a sinus infection or the common cold. The blocked sinus can restrict blood flow to the ear, but this noise shouldn’t worry you since it is more likely to pass in some time.

Health Conditions Related to Tinnitus: Conclusion

Tinnitus is often a sign that there is another, more serious health condition that you need to get checked for. If the ringing in your ears persists for too long, you should visit a professional immediately.

Stephen Geller Katz at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ has over 20 years of experience providing excellent Tinnitus Retraining Therapy TRT.

Visit us in person or give us a call today for a consultation.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

Can a Therapist Treat my Tinnitus?

Can a therapist treat my tinnitus? People with tinnitus often hear hissing, buzzing, clicking, or ringing sounds in their ears. Contrary to popular belief, however, tinnitus is not a disease itself. Instead, it is a symptom associated with a psychological condition or ear nerve problems. Ten percent of the United States population suffers from tinnitus every year. Sometimes, the issue only lasts for a few minutes. The ringing or buzzing sounds often appear in both or one ear, either soft or excessively loud.

Can a Therapist Treat my Tinnitus?
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Severe tinnitus can be quite a nuisance for people as it can cause problems working, sleeping, or hearing. Surprisingly, tinnitus can be caused by a blockage in the ears and may not last more than ten to twelve seconds. However, it can also arise from serious conditions, which may include:

  • Thyroid disease
  • Meniere’s disease
  • Hormonal changes
  • Brain tumors
  • Circulatory system diseases
  • Heart problems
  • Sinus infections
  • Ear infections
  • Hearing loss resulting from loud noises

Can a Therapist or Doctor Treat Tinnitus?

Determining the issue that caused tinnitus to develop in the first place is vital for treating it properly. A qualified doctor can determine the underlying cause by addressing the problem through surgery or medications.

Believe it or not, many individuals do not have any identifiable cause for their condition, which experts usually call idiopathic tinnitus. So far, idiopathic tinnitus doesn’t have a cure, but there are certain remedies to lower its severity.

Is it Possible to Manage Tinnitus by Yourself?

While it is always advisable to consult with an expert, there are certain things you can do to keep the ringing sounds at bay by yourself. Here are some of the most common ones:

Tinnitus Sound Therapy

Treating the underlying cause behind tinnitus is the most effective way to tackle the condition. Certain sound therapies may help distract you from tinnitus symptoms like buzzing or ringing sounds if you do not suffer from hearing loss.

Hearing Aids May Help

In most cases, tinnitus develops due to hearing loss. When an individual loses their ability to hear, their brain goes through various changes in how it perceives and processes different sounds. In cases like these, using a hearing aid could come in handy.

For those wondering, hearing aids are small devices that use an amplifier, speaker, and microphone to increase the volume of outside noises. The gadget can help your brain understand new and effective ways of processing sounds.

It can be especially helpful for people with tinnitus as improvement in their hearing could reduce the ringing sounds caused by the condition. A reputable survey noted that around sixty percent of individuals suffering from tinnitus noticed varying levels of improvement with the help of hearing aids.

Tinnitus Patients May Benefit from Sound Masking Gadgets

Sound masking devices can create pleasant noises to keep the unpleasant tinnitus sounds at bay. Numerous gadgets like tabletop sound machines and small gadgets can help tinnitus patients with their condition. Sound masking gadgets can play:

  • Music
  • Nature noises
  • Pink noise
  • White noise

Can a Therapist Treat my Tinnitus? Psychotherapy LCSW
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Can a Therapist Treat my Tinnitus? It’s Best to Consult a Pro

While the tips mentioned above can be quite effective, it is still best to consult a professional to choose the right action. That’s where Stephen Katz and the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ can help you. Get in touch with us to book an appointment, and our team of experts will evaluate your condition and suggest the right treatment options, ensuring you can go about your days without any stress. 

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

Best Ways to Manage Tinnitus

What are the best ways to manage tinnitus? Tinnitus can be a difficult condition to both diagnose and treat, especially since a physician can never say with any guarantee how long it will last. Despite extensive research in the field, a lot about this condition remains unknown, which makes a proper diagnosis all the more difficult.

Best Ways to Manage Tinnitus
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Since tinnitus could be a symptom of an underlying condition,  physicians must consider various factors before recommending any treatment. So if you currently hear a ringing in your ear from time to time, you don’t have to struggle continuously. Instead, you can better manage your condition by following these tips.

Ways to Better Manage Your Tinnitus

One of the best ways to better manage your tinnitus is by finding out the many things that could trigger it. By understanding these smaller triggers, you can learn how to manage your condition better. Here are a few ways that you can better manage it:

Try to Get More Sleep

One of the few major reasons people hear a ringing in their ears is that they do not get enough rest. Sleep deficiency can lead to a vicious cycle of people not being able to sleep due to tinnitus, depriving them of valuable sleep, which then worsens tinnitus symptoms.

One of the ways that people try to manage their tinnitus to get more sleep is by playing soothing or masking sounds to cancel out the ringing in the ear. These soothing sounds could be of waves, nature, or even of white noise.

Allow Yourself to Relax

Sometimes, the only thing that makes tinnitus worse is you keep thinking about it. Constant stress is also a major contributor to this condition, as the stress could make the blood vessels less elastic. These blood vessels can transfer blood much faster, increasing the ear’s ringing.

It would help if you considered looking into Yoga, meditation, or any other recreational activity that can help you feel more at ease. Listening to music can also be a good way to relax, but avoid using ear plugs that go into the ear and loud volume.

Get Effective Hearing Protection

Another popular trigger for tinnitus includes loud noises, regardless of where they come from. Even if the loud noise is music, like at a concert, then it is very likely that you will hear a sharp ringing during or after the event.

In these specific instances, you must get effective hearing protection. From noise canceling headphones to earplugs, whatever can comfortably block out loud sounds can help you avoid tinnitus from resurfacing.

Best Ways to Manage Tinnitus TRT
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Reduce Consumption of Alcohol and Caffeine

Tinnitus can also be temporary, usually due to high blood pressure. Therefore, you should avoid consuming things that could spike your blood pressure. Caffeine and alcohol are infamous for increasing blood pressure to a dangerous degree, which could lead to a ringing in your ear.

If you depend on caffeine to help you get through the day, you should consult a physician on how to move away from it slowly.

Stop Smoking

Aside from the different ways that smoking can affect the body, it can also lead to people experiencing serious hearing loss. Smoking can also cause coughing fits, putting a lot of pressure on the inner ears.

Try Tinnitus Retraining Therapy

Tinnitus retraining therapy aims to make slightly better improvements of the reactions made because of the links between the autonomic nervous system and limbic system. Its goal is to make the person suffering from Tinnitus habituate to the sounds and perceptions its brain is making. The Tinnitus retraining therapy involves several techniques that can achieve this.

Learn more about TRT here: https://www.tinnitustreatmentnyc.com/do-you-have-tinnitus-you-may-benefit-from-tinnitus-retraining-therapy/

Best Ways to Manage Tinnitus: Conclusion

Tinnitus is an unfortunately common occurrence in individuals. Some can have it for just a short time, but others experience it as a persistent problem. Following these tips and effectively managing triggers for tinnitus can help you live a more comfortable life.

Stephen Geller Katz at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ in New York, has over 20 years of experience providing excellent tinnitus retraining therapy. Visit us in person or give us a call today.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

All About Cognitive Retraining Therapy

Have you wondered what cognitive retraining therapy is and if it can effectively treat tinnitus? Managing tinnitus is quite a nuanced process, and experts resort to various approaches depending on the sufferer’s symptoms. Cognitive retraining or cognitive behavioral therapy is among the most effective approach to help people with tinnitus.

Cognitive Retraining Therapy for tinnitus
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Does Tinnitus have a Cure?

Generally speaking, tinnitus does not have a cure so far. Fortunately, there are effective treatments to lower the severity of this condition. Cognitive retraining therapy is among the most effective ways to manage tinnitus related distress.

A Close Look at CGT

This therapy was formed by Dr. Aaron Beck, who realized that inaccurate or distorted beliefs and thoughts were caused by depression and could be treated through cognitive therapy. CRT is based on a model that focuses on the link between thoughts, emotions, and behaviors and offers practical ways to help people.

At its core, cognitive retraining therapy helps solve patients’ problems to improve their sense of well being. It is a major reason why many reputable mental health experts use CRT or CBT to help their patients.

Tinnitus and Cognitive Retraining Therapy

During cognitive retraining therapy sessions, healthcare providers and patients usually work together to spot dysfunctional thoughts and the scenarios they appear in. After that, the provider and patient work to create a formidable, well thought out plan to control their negative reactions. They usually do this by incorporating positive coping techniques that help them shift their attention from tinnitus.

More often than not, cognitive retraining therapy involves around ten to twelve therapy sessions in groups or individually. The goal of each session is to address a particular topic, like a deep dive into what tinnitus is, stress management, sleep hygiene, cognitive restructuring, relaxation, etc. That said, the cognitive retraining process tends to differ for every patient because the therapy is tailored to meet an individual patient’s particular needs.

The theme of utilizing goal oriented techniques to solve problems, responding to negative and dysfunctional thoughts, and modifying negative patterns is the same. Some therapists also implement aspects of other approaches, like mindfulness and acceptance commitment therapy, as these practices complement CRT and CBT.

How Does CRT Help Tinnitus Patients

As most of you know, tinnitus usually stays with people for their entire life. This condition can be quite intrusive and often causes people to think negatively and disrupt their daily lives. Positive thinking isn’t enough to alleviate tinnitus symptoms or ignore them. Instead, it would help if you retrain your mind, which cognitive retraining therapy can help you with.

Best Cognitive Retraining Therapy for tinnitus
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Our thoughts influence how we behave and feel. For instance, getting late for a meeting makes us frustrated, even though it is very little, we can do about it. Merely stop to take a deep breath and realize that all you can do is help change how you behave for the better. Cognitive retraining therapy works similarly, helping us calm down whenever we hear ringing noises.

Cognitive Retraining Therapy: Final Thoughts

If tinnitus is getting in your way and preventing you from living a high quality life, it would be best to look for help. You must avoid listening to non professional advice from anyone who is not a doctor. You can’t afford to try and fix things on your own without the involvement of a doctor because that could worsen your condition and make it difficult for even the best professionals to treat it.

At the tinnitus cognitive center, Stephen Katz knows how to diagnose and choose the most effective treatments on a case by case basis. So, waste no time booking an appointment with us, and we will go above and beyond to ensure you can live a stress free life.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

What Are Sound Disorders?

What are sound disorders? Speech and hearing related health problems are now gaining more awareness among the public. This allows patients and their families to recognize symptoms and get help at earlier stages. A speech sound disorder occurs when a person struggles with producing speech sounds. As a result, they are unable to communicate properly.

What Are Sound Disorders?
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Of course, it is normal for little children to say words incorrectly and find difficulty in communicating their thoughts. But, it should concern you if they struggle to make the correct sounds even past their vocabulary-learning age. Then, you might want to consult a medical professional and seek treatment in a timely manner. Continue reading to learn more about speech sound disorders.

Sound Disorder

Speech sound disorders are simply communication disorders that affect how a person perceives sounds and the way they say them. Generally common in children, people with speech sound disorders experience trouble in making correct sounds and speaking clearly.

Some children even struggle to produce some specific sounds only or find difficulty controlling their voice. Others with sound speech disorders also suffer from speaking problems like stuttering lisp or stutter. In such cases, their speech is so incoherent that people around them are unable to make what the child is trying to say.

A speech sound disorder is not the same as a language disorder. In fact, speech sound disorder only refers to difficulty in making sounds, whereas language disorders involve problems understanding and speaking a language in general. Children with sound disorders do not have any problem with understanding language.

By the age of 8, most children know enough vocabulary to communicate their thoughts effectively. However, if your child still hasn’t mastered the basic words, they may be struggling with a speech sound disorder.

Speech sound disorders involve phonological process disorders and articulation disorders.

  • Phonological process disorder: pattern of sound mistakes such as leaving out certain letters when pronouncing a word.
  • Articulation disorder: problem with producing certain sounds like the ‘sh’ or ‘ch’ sound.

What are the Symptoms of Speech Sound Disorder?

It is normal for children to struggle initially as they learn to speak, but most kids speak very clearly by the time they turn 3. In case a child’s speech is not developing with age, they might be suffering from a speech disorder.

Some common symptoms include:

  • Trouble moving lips, tongue, and jaw
  • Difficulty in making specific sounds
  • Not speaking as well as other children of the same age
  • Not speaking clearly
  • Sudden changes in pitch and volume
  • Nasal or hoarse voice when speaking
  • Panting while talking
  • Stuttering or lisping
  • Struggle with using facial muscles such as while chewing or blowing nose

Although speech sound disorders usually show up during early childhood years, they may also appear later in life.

What Are Sound Disorders | Causes & Treatment
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Signs of articulation disorders include:

  • Skipping certain sounds from words (for example: only saying ‘coo’ while trying to say ‘school)
  • Adding extra sounds to words (for example: saying ‘puhlay’ while trying to say ‘play’)
  • Distorting the pronunciation of words (for example: saying ‘dhith’ while trying to say ‘this’)
  • Swapping letters between words (for example: swapping r in ‘radio’ with w)

Signs of phonological process disorders include:

  • Only saying one syllable in multiple syllable words (for example: saying ‘bay’ while trying to say ‘baby’)
  • Repeating syllables in a word to simplify the word (for example: saying ‘baba’ while trying to say ‘bottle’)
  • Leaving out the sound of consonants in a word (for example: saying ‘at’ while trying to say ‘rat’)
  • Changing the sound of a consonant in words (for example: saying ‘tat’ while trying to say ‘cat’)

What Are Sound Disorders? Conclusion

Speech sound disorders usually appear in the early childhood years, but some adults also show signs later in life. Although the real cause for sound disorders is still unknown, experts believe it has to do with gender, pre and peri-natal problems, and family history. Treatment plans can help patients suffering from articulation and phonological process disorders through the use of different strategies and activities.

The Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ in New York provides excellent sound therapies, with a specialty in tinnitus cognitive retraining therapy and misophonia treatment. Visit Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R, in person or give us a call at 646-213-2321 for an online video consultation with Dr. Katz.

Traumatic Causes of Tinnitus

What are some traumatic causes of tinnitus? If you have ever experienced a concussion or a traumatic brain injury, you may have noticed your ears ringing for a few minutes or possibly even longer. For instance, blasts or airbag injuries can cause your ears to ring, make you feel dizzy and even result in hearing loss. Almost anyone can suffer a traumatic brain injury, but older people are more likely to suffer from such events.

In the U.S alone, people aged seventy five and older tend to have the highest number of hospitalizations related to brain injuries. The first thing doctors do after such a situation is stabilize their patients. In most cases, it takes time for patients to notice symptoms and signs of Tinnitus or any other audiological disorder. Sometimes, it even takes days or weeks to notice any tinnitus related symptoms.

Patients often don’t pay attention to the hissing sound or think it is normal, only to realize later that they have Tinnitus. If you have had an accident recently that resulted in brain injuries, you should visit a doctor and get a checkup as soon as possible.

Traumatic Causes of Tinnitus
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Traumatic Injuries and the Link with Tinnitus

TBI is a head trauma that prevents the brain from functioning normally. Most traumatic brain injuries happen because of falls, followed by assaults and car crashes. Any blow, jolt, or bump that causes the brain and head to move back and forth rapidly can cause the brain to twist or bounce inside the skull, resulting in chemical changes.

It can also cause irreversible damage to the cells and result in Tinnitus. It is worth keeping in mind that you don’t necessarily have to get hit directly in the head to get a TBI. Lurching forward at a high pace during a car accident or hitting the brakes too hard can cause brain injuries. Also, you can get a brain injury without losing consciousness, which is quite dangerous as issues like these often go undiagnosed until they get worse.

Doctors often use the term “concussion” to describe a brain injury to parents, as it doesn’t sound too alarming. Still, a concussion is a traumatic brain injury. According to a study, patients aged fourteen or older who went to urban hospitals after suffering from a mild traumatic brain injury were sent home. What makes matters even worse is that these children were not called for a follow up.

Because of this, more than twenty seven percent of the children sent home developed Tinnitus and various cognitive issues that required therapy. If you or someone you know has had an injury like this, ensure a proper checkup.

Auditory Issues Triggered by a Traumatic Injury to the Brain

Here is a list of auditory problems caused by a traumatic brain injury:

  • Tinnitus
  • Hearing loss
  • Loudness intolerance or noise sensitivity
  • Decreased tolerance for particular sounds
  • Aural fullness
  • Auditory processing issues

Traumatic injuries can also result in balance problems, which include:

Most Traumatic Causes of Tinnitus
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Traumatic Causes of Tinnitus: Final Thoughts

Unfortunately, more than fifty percent of people who suffer from traumatic brain injuries develop auditory problems like Tinnitus at some point in their lives. These people often notice phantom sounds like buzzing, ringing, or hissing. If you or someone you know has Tinnitus, make sure to get professional treatment right away.

Stephen Katz Tinnitus Cognitive Center ™ can evaluate tinnitus patients and determine the best treatment. Get in touch with us to book an appointment, and one of our experts will diagnose the root of your condition to formulate a well thought out treatment plan.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

About Stephen Katz

Top Tinnitus Treatments

What are the top tinnitus treatments? While many would think that the ringing they hear in their ears is nothing too serious, that unfortunately may not be the case. This ringing that people hear in their ears is called tinnitus, and it sometimes it is a symptom of a much larger health concern.

Top tinnitus treatments USA UK EURO
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Therefore, even if it does not seem serious, you need to be careful and look for more effective methods to treat it before it worsens with time. Fortunately, professionals have worked on many treatment options for tinnitus, including the symptom itself or the underlying health concern.

What are the Symptoms of Tinnitus?

Tinnitus has very obvious symptoms, but it can also be very personal. Often the ringing that people hear is unique to their ears, and no one else can hear it. It can usually happen when the small hairs in your inner ears undergo damage.

Due to the subjective nature of tinnitus, people can also be hesitant to tell others about what they are experiencing. Luckily, physicians have definitive ways of checking if a person has tinnitus and its severity. And depending on what they find, they will be able to recommend different treatment options.

Treatment Options for Tinnitus

Getting treatment for tinnitus is rarely ever simple, as physicians must first go through the proper process of diagnosing the situation. Therefore, treatment options can vary widely depending on the type of tinnitus a person has and their underlying medical condition. However, some very popular treatment options for tinnitus include the following:

Using Hearing Aids

Individuals who lose their hearing due to old age or loud noises can greatly benefit from hearing aids. These hearing aids can help reduce the ringing resulting from hearing loss.

Removing Ear Wax

The body naturally produces ear wax to protect the opening of the ears from dust and dirt. However, if the ear canal accumulates too much of it, it will likely affect the individual’s ability to hear clearly. Of course, you should only try to remove the wax using a q tip. Instead, it would help if you visited a professional who can safely clean out your ears.

Suppress the Excess Noise

People with tinnitus often face the most difficulty sleeping since there are no external voices to help mask the sound. Therefore, they will need to properly mask their tinnitus sound using various other types of soothing sounds. White noise machines often have various sounds that can help an individual sleep with tinnitus. You can also find unique headphones designed for people to wear when they sleep since they do not hurt the inside of their ears.

Best top tinnitus treatments
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Tinnitus Retraining Therapy

Tinnitus Retraining Therapy (TRT) is one of the most important treatment solutions individuals can get since it focuses on treating tinnitus symptoms through counseling and sound masking techniques. You will likely go to an audiologist specializing in treating conditions like tinnitus.

They will give you a masking device to wear while offering counsel. Not only are they trying to help relieve symptoms in the short term, but they are also helping an individual’s ears block out the noise. The treatment will also help you better manage your feelings when dealing with those symptoms.

Top Tinnitus Treatments: Conclusion

Tinnitus can be a very serious issue for many individuals, as it can greatly affect their lives. But with the right diagnosis and treatment options, people can learn to manage their symptoms and live normal lives again. With more than 20 years of experience of providing Tinnitus Retraining Therapy TRT, Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW R at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ in New York, can surely help you with your condition.

Give us a call for an online consultation today.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

Things That Can Trigger Tinnitus

What are the main things that can trigger tinnitus? Tinnitus is a condition that causes ringing in an individual’s ears. The condition could result from an individual’s age or be a symptom of a more serious health concern. Furthermore, the sounds that people with tinnitus hear do not result from any external sounds.

Things That Can Trigger Tinnitus
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Instead, the noises result from damage to the inner ear’s tiny hairs. These damaged hairs will send a different signal to your brain, essentially controlling how you hear sound. These small hairs can likely be damaged due to injuries, lack of blood circulation, or even old age.

Tinnitus can be a temporary condition, or it could turn into a permanent condition. However, people can be more careful by understanding what causes the ringing in an individual’s ears.

Triggers for Tinnitus

Multiple factors could trigger tinnitus in an individual. Therefore, by understanding each trigger, individuals can avoid certain situations or be more careful. Some of these triggers include:

High Blood Pressure

The first possible trigger for tinnitus could be an individual’s blood pressure issues. More specifically, an individual with high blood pressure could likely have to deal with tinnitus. Furthermore, hardening of the arteries or rising blood pressure in the short term due to stress, nicotine, caffeine, or alcohol can also trigger the condition.

Hen blood vessel close to the inner and middle ear becomes less elastic; your blood flow can be much stronger and seem much louder. This condition is called Pulsatile Tinnitus.

TMJ Issues

TMJ, or the temporomandibular joint, can also lead to tinnitus since the joint connects to the middle ear through multiple nerves and ligaments. One of the major signs of TMJ is the popping sound that most people can hear when chewing.

Sinus and Ear Infection

One of the major reasons that people suffer from temporary tinnitus is because of a sinus or ear infection. People who will often be dealing with the common cold are very likely to hear ringing in their ears until they can recover.

These infections add pressure to the sinus, affecting an individual’s hearing. This type of temporary tinnitus will likely go away within a week as individuals eventually heal from the common cold. However, if you can heal from other common cold symptoms but still struggle with tinnitus, you should visit a physician immediately.

Too Much Earwax

A common reason why people might have tinnitus is that they have too much earwax in their ear canals. The body produces this wax to protect an individual’s ears from dust and dirt. However, people must clean their ears regularly since excess buildup can affect their hearing ability.

If you have too much ear wax built up into your, you should avoid trying to get it out yourself. Instead, visit a professional who will remove the excess gunk very gently.

Common Things That Can Trigger Tinnitus
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Loud Noises

This specific trigger can be especially dangerous for individuals since they cannot control their environment. So far, loud noises are one of the leading causes of tinnitus, and it can usually include various noises such as music, sudden loud bursts, objects clattering, and crashing cars. Engine backfiring can also contribute to tinnitus.

The ringing that people are experiencing could happen in one or both ears, with the damage being temporary or permanent.

Things That Can Trigger Tinnitus: Conclusion

Tinnitus can be a heavy daily burden for those with the condition. Luckily there are effective cognitive tinnitus treatments that can lessen or even cure the condition. Knowing the common triggers can also help manage tinnitus.

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW R at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ in New York, has over 20 years of experience providing excellent Tinnitus Retraining Therapy TRT. Call today for an expert consultation.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

Is There A Relationship Between Tinnitus & Anxiety?

Is there a relationship between tinnitus and anxiety? Anxiety impacts people in different ways. Some experience difficulty sleeping, while others feel uneasy the entire time. Some people also experience ringing in their ears, a condition that experts call tinnitus. People suffering from tinnitus often hear hissing, buzzing, or ringing sounds. The severity of this condition often varies from one individual to the other. However, it can be incredibly disruptive and distracting, affecting the sufferer’s quality of life in more ways than one.

Tinnitus treatments usually vary based on the cause. For instance, experts may suggest stress relieving activities, medications, or even certain therapies, especially for tinnitus caused by anxiety.

Relationship Between Tinnitus & Anxiety?
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Does Anxiety Cause Tinnitus?

Anxiety is the body’s way of responding to stress. People experience stress because of the interplay between their thoughts and physical reactions. Moreover, the American Psychological Association states common anxiety characteristics include anxious thoughts, elevated blood pressure, and tense feelings.

Doctors often link anxiousness to various medical conditions, which include tinnitus. Over forty percent of individuals who suffer from chronic tinnitus have anxiety symptoms. These symptoms often cause tinnitus to worsen. Some of the common sounds tinnitus sufferers notice include:

  • Musical notes
  • Air escaping
  • Sizzling
  • Whistling
  • Hissing
  • Buzzing
  • Fluttering
  • Humming

Tinnitus can be especially disturbing for people who experience it for the first time, causing difficulties focusing and sleeping in some cases. If you experience any symptoms that seem like signs of Tinnitus, you should get in touch with a doctor. There are treatments for this condition so you don’t have to panic.

The Interlinked Relationship of Tinnitus and Anxiety

Tinnitus and anxiety have a linked relationship. In some situations, mental health conditions like anxiety can often result in tinnitus. Worse, tinnitus can elevate anxiety episodes because it makes the individual worry.

About sixty percent of chronic tinnitus sufferers also have depression. So far, there is very little research to prove whether tinnitus occurs before a psychological condition or after, but there is a visible link between tinnitus and psychological distress.

Other Anxiety Symptoms

Individuals who suffer from anxiety have intrusive thoughts that tend to return continuously. Some people even experience physical symptoms like:

  • Nightmares
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Heart palpitations
  • Muscle tension
  • Dry mouth
  • Sweating
  • Headaches
  • Trembling
  • Twitching

Managing Tinnitus

Tinnitus can happen due to various factors, and almost everyone experiences it differently. Therefore, the most appropriate management or treatment options for tinnitus sufferers usually depend on their particular symptoms. Currently, tinnitus doesn’t have a scientifically proven cure. However, certain therapies and treatments can minimize their severity and impact, helping people live comfortably.

Doctors often recommend the following things:

  • Relaxation techniques
  • Hearing aids
  • Sound therapy
  • Anti depressants and other medications

If these things do not work, speaking with a professional therapist or skilled counselor may help people manage their responses and emotions to tinnitus. CBT, also known as cognitive behavioral therapy, has proven to be quite effective in improving tinnitus patients’ quality of life by improving their overall mental health.

Is there Relationship Between Tinnitus & Anxiety?
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Relationship Between Tinnitus & Anxiety: Final Thoughts

Tinnitus can cause many disruptions in your life and become an anchor around your neck if you don’t tackle it. While certain tips can help you get relief at home, it is best to consult a pro, and that’s where tinnitus treatment specialist Stephen Katz can help you. Book an appointment with us, and we will evaluate the severity of your condition and offer a viable solution to alleviate your symptoms.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

How Do I Stop Ringing in the Ears Tinnitus?

If you are suffering from tinnitus, you want to know how to stop the ringing in your ears. Some people often notice their ears ringing at regular intervals, while others may hear a buzzing, roaring, or hissing in their heads. Sometimes the sounds are intermittent, and other times, they can be constant. Issues like these can be a minor or massive distraction, depending on their severity. If you are among the ten percent of people who experience tinnitus, you can alleviate it to some extent.

Stop Ringing in the Ears Tinnitus
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Tinnitus – What Is It?

The condition is referred to as tinnitus when the human ear perceives sound without external sound. The noise is either perceived in both or one ear and, in some cases, in the head. Generally, people with this condition report hearing waves, wind, whooshing, songs, crickets, roaring, whistling, humming, hissing, high pitched ringing, and whatnot in the head.

According to the American Tinnitus Association, over fifty million people in the United States experience this condition to some extent. Out of these fifty million Americans, about twelve million suffer from extreme tinnitus and require medical attention.

What Tinnitus Patients Should do to Minimize or Stop Ringing in the Ears

If you think you suffer from tinnitus, the first thing to do is to notice the details regarding your symptoms. Were you exposed to loud noises, or did you start taking medicine before the ringing started? Are both of your ears affected, or do you have hearing issues? Make sure you consider such questions before opting for any treatment.

Take the time to observe what makes the ringing worse. Some individuals state that certain drugs, drinks, and food often worsen their symptoms. Remember, tinnitus affects everybody differently, so avoid different triggers and maintain a written log. You don’t necessarily have to avoid each trigger, but notice things that impact your symptoms.

Here are some things that may trigger your tinnitus:

  • Salt
  • Aspirin
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeinated drinks like energy drinks, tea, coffee, and cola

Do these Things to Possibly Avoid Ringing in the Ears

If your tinnitus is becoming too much of a problem, consider doing the following things to prevent the ringing sounds in your ears or head.

Avoid Smoking

If you are a regular smoker, consider avoiding it entirely. Smoking can worsen the tinnitus in more ways than one. First off, it affects the blood flow toward your sensitive nerve cells. Secondly, it also acts as a stimulant, causing the ringing to sound even louder.

Soothing Sounds May Help

Sometimes tinnitus can become a bigger bother than it usually is when it is too quiet. You can do the following things to distract your mind from the sounds in your head and ears:

  • Turn your fan on
  • Listen to some light music
  • Listen to a podcast

Some people also report that using a white noise machine can help offset the ringing sounds. These devices can create different soothing sounds, like the sounds of a running stream, rainfall, or ocean waves.

Take some Time Out to Relax

It is normal to get annoyed or anxious when you notice a ringing or buzzing sound in your ears. However, worrying can worsen these symptoms. Consider trying different techniques to calm your mind until you find something that works for you. Sometimes even a few minutes of relaxation can make you feel better significantly.

How to Stop Ringing in the Ears Tinnitus
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Stop Ringing in the Ears Tinnitus: Final Thoughts

Tinnitus can become a massive burden for those suffering from it and can prevent people from going about their day. If you or someone you know experiences ringing in the ears, Stephen Katz may be able to help. Just book an appointment by contacting us. Dr. Katz will diagnose and possibly resolve your issue, ensuring you can go about your day without getting overwhelmed and distracted by ringing in your ears.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

Health Conditions Related to Tinnitus

Are there health conditions related to tinnitus? Despite being lesser known, nearly 50 million Americans are struggling with tinnitus. However, since people sometimes think that a faint ringing in their ear is fine or natural, less than half of those diagnosed will seek out help.

Health conditions related to tinnitus
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More importantly, tinnitus is often not the problem since it is more or less a signal that an underlying health condition needs your attention. To help educate people about the health conditions often related to tinnitus.

Common Types of Tinnitus

While tinnitus refers to the noise or ringing people can hear inside their ears, they often fall into two broader categories. These include subjective tinnitus and objective tinnitus. The main difference between the two is that the subjective category is unique to the individual.

But as for objective tinnitus, a medical expert can hear noise in your ear using devices such as a stethoscope. An audiologist will likely perform the tests necessary to determine which category you have.

Each category can have unique causes, with objective tinnitus often resulting from severe muscle spasms. But as for the subjective type, it is more than likely that subjective tinnitus results from factors like aging or exposure to loud noise.

Health Conditions Related to Tinnitus

Tinnitus is often a sign that an individual has other, more serious health conditions for which they should get treatment. Here is a more detailed list of the medical conditions often related to tinnitus.

Diabetes

People with diabetes are at an increased risk of developing tinnitus for various reasons. People with diabetes will already have trouble with their blood flow, which can make them significantly more susceptible to trouble with their hearing.

Elevated blood sugar levels can also lead to people developing tinnitus symptoms.

Higher Blood Pressure

Higher blood pressure can contribute to people developing tinnitus. Of course, it will still contribute to tinnitus if people have naturally higher blood pressure or are in situations where it is likely to rise.

Other factors that can increase blood pressure, such as caffeine and alcohol, are more than likely to spike blood pressure. And when it does, it is not uncommon for people to hear a ringing in their ears.

Ear Infections

If an individual has an ear infection, they are more than likely to have tinnitus. Since blood flow to the ears is restricted during an ear infection, the inner ear will likely develop tinnitus.

Autoimmune Disorders

Another serious health condition related to tinnitus is an autoimmune disease known as lupus. People struggling with autoimmune diseases will eventually lead to peripheral auditory dysfunction, which can lead to hearing a noise in their ears.

Health conditions related to tinnitus | TRT Treatment
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Hearing Loss

People who lose their hearing, whether due to old age or an accident, are most likely to develop tinnitus. The only treatment to deal with this condition is for the individual to get hearing aids to reduce tinnitus symptoms.

Sinus and the Common Cold

Along with various other conditions, tinnitus could signify that the individual has a sinus infection or the common cold. The blocked sinus can restrict blood flow to the ear, but this noise shouldn’t worry you since it is more likely to pass in some time.

Health Conditions Related to Tinnitus: Conclusion

Tinnitus is often a sign that there is another, more serious health condition that you need to get checked for. If the ringing in your ears persists for too long, you should visit a professional immediately.

Stephen Geller Katz at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ has over 20 years of experience providing excellent Tinnitus Retraining Therapy TRT.

Visit us in person or give us a call today for a consultation.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

Can a Therapist Treat my Tinnitus?

Can a therapist treat my tinnitus? People with tinnitus often hear hissing, buzzing, clicking, or ringing sounds in their ears. Contrary to popular belief, however, tinnitus is not a disease itself. Instead, it is a symptom associated with a psychological condition or ear nerve problems. Ten percent of the United States population suffers from tinnitus every year. Sometimes, the issue only lasts for a few minutes. The ringing or buzzing sounds often appear in both or one ear, either soft or excessively loud.

Can a Therapist Treat my Tinnitus?
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Severe tinnitus can be quite a nuisance for people as it can cause problems working, sleeping, or hearing. Surprisingly, tinnitus can be caused by a blockage in the ears and may not last more than ten to twelve seconds. However, it can also arise from serious conditions, which may include:

  • Thyroid disease
  • Meniere’s disease
  • Hormonal changes
  • Brain tumors
  • Circulatory system diseases
  • Heart problems
  • Sinus infections
  • Ear infections
  • Hearing loss resulting from loud noises

Can a Therapist or Doctor Treat Tinnitus?

Determining the issue that caused tinnitus to develop in the first place is vital for treating it properly. A qualified doctor can determine the underlying cause by addressing the problem through surgery or medications.

Believe it or not, many individuals do not have any identifiable cause for their condition, which experts usually call idiopathic tinnitus. So far, idiopathic tinnitus doesn’t have a cure, but there are certain remedies to lower its severity.

Is it Possible to Manage Tinnitus by Yourself?

While it is always advisable to consult with an expert, there are certain things you can do to keep the ringing sounds at bay by yourself. Here are some of the most common ones:

Tinnitus Sound Therapy

Treating the underlying cause behind tinnitus is the most effective way to tackle the condition. Certain sound therapies may help distract you from tinnitus symptoms like buzzing or ringing sounds if you do not suffer from hearing loss.

Hearing Aids May Help

In most cases, tinnitus develops due to hearing loss. When an individual loses their ability to hear, their brain goes through various changes in how it perceives and processes different sounds. In cases like these, using a hearing aid could come in handy.

For those wondering, hearing aids are small devices that use an amplifier, speaker, and microphone to increase the volume of outside noises. The gadget can help your brain understand new and effective ways of processing sounds.

It can be especially helpful for people with tinnitus as improvement in their hearing could reduce the ringing sounds caused by the condition. A reputable survey noted that around sixty percent of individuals suffering from tinnitus noticed varying levels of improvement with the help of hearing aids.

Tinnitus Patients May Benefit from Sound Masking Gadgets

Sound masking devices can create pleasant noises to keep the unpleasant tinnitus sounds at bay. Numerous gadgets like tabletop sound machines and small gadgets can help tinnitus patients with their condition. Sound masking gadgets can play:

  • Music
  • Nature noises
  • Pink noise
  • White noise

Can a Therapist Treat my Tinnitus? Psychotherapy LCSW
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Can a Therapist Treat my Tinnitus? It’s Best to Consult a Pro

While the tips mentioned above can be quite effective, it is still best to consult a professional to choose the right action. That’s where Stephen Katz and the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ can help you. Get in touch with us to book an appointment, and our team of experts will evaluate your condition and suggest the right treatment options, ensuring you can go about your days without any stress. 

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

Best Ways to Manage Tinnitus

What are the best ways to manage tinnitus? Tinnitus can be a difficult condition to both diagnose and treat, especially since a physician can never say with any guarantee how long it will last. Despite extensive research in the field, a lot about this condition remains unknown, which makes a proper diagnosis all the more difficult.

Best Ways to Manage Tinnitus
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Since tinnitus could be a symptom of an underlying condition,  physicians must consider various factors before recommending any treatment. So if you currently hear a ringing in your ear from time to time, you don’t have to struggle continuously. Instead, you can better manage your condition by following these tips.

Ways to Better Manage Your Tinnitus

One of the best ways to better manage your tinnitus is by finding out the many things that could trigger it. By understanding these smaller triggers, you can learn how to manage your condition better. Here are a few ways that you can better manage it:

Try to Get More Sleep

One of the few major reasons people hear a ringing in their ears is that they do not get enough rest. Sleep deficiency can lead to a vicious cycle of people not being able to sleep due to tinnitus, depriving them of valuable sleep, which then worsens tinnitus symptoms.

One of the ways that people try to manage their tinnitus to get more sleep is by playing soothing or masking sounds to cancel out the ringing in the ear. These soothing sounds could be of waves, nature, or even of white noise.

Allow Yourself to Relax

Sometimes, the only thing that makes tinnitus worse is you keep thinking about it. Constant stress is also a major contributor to this condition, as the stress could make the blood vessels less elastic. These blood vessels can transfer blood much faster, increasing the ear’s ringing.

It would help if you considered looking into Yoga, meditation, or any other recreational activity that can help you feel more at ease. Listening to music can also be a good way to relax, but avoid using ear plugs that go into the ear and loud volume.

Get Effective Hearing Protection

Another popular trigger for tinnitus includes loud noises, regardless of where they come from. Even if the loud noise is music, like at a concert, then it is very likely that you will hear a sharp ringing during or after the event.

In these specific instances, you must get effective hearing protection. From noise canceling headphones to earplugs, whatever can comfortably block out loud sounds can help you avoid tinnitus from resurfacing.

Best Ways to Manage Tinnitus TRT
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Reduce Consumption of Alcohol and Caffeine

Tinnitus can also be temporary, usually due to high blood pressure. Therefore, you should avoid consuming things that could spike your blood pressure. Caffeine and alcohol are infamous for increasing blood pressure to a dangerous degree, which could lead to a ringing in your ear.

If you depend on caffeine to help you get through the day, you should consult a physician on how to move away from it slowly.

Stop Smoking

Aside from the different ways that smoking can affect the body, it can also lead to people experiencing serious hearing loss. Smoking can also cause coughing fits, putting a lot of pressure on the inner ears.

Try Tinnitus Retraining Therapy

Tinnitus retraining therapy aims to make slightly better improvements of the reactions made because of the links between the autonomic nervous system and limbic system. Its goal is to make the person suffering from Tinnitus habituate to the sounds and perceptions its brain is making. The Tinnitus retraining therapy involves several techniques that can achieve this.

Learn more about TRT here: https://www.tinnitustreatmentnyc.com/do-you-have-tinnitus-you-may-benefit-from-tinnitus-retraining-therapy/

Best Ways to Manage Tinnitus: Conclusion

Tinnitus is an unfortunately common occurrence in individuals. Some can have it for just a short time, but others experience it as a persistent problem. Following these tips and effectively managing triggers for tinnitus can help you live a more comfortable life.

Stephen Geller Katz at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ in New York, has over 20 years of experience providing excellent tinnitus retraining therapy. Visit us in person or give us a call today.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

All About Cognitive Retraining Therapy

Have you wondered what cognitive retraining therapy is and if it can effectively treat tinnitus? Managing tinnitus is quite a nuanced process, and experts resort to various approaches depending on the sufferer’s symptoms. Cognitive retraining or cognitive behavioral therapy is among the most effective approach to help people with tinnitus.

Cognitive Retraining Therapy for tinnitus
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Does Tinnitus have a Cure?

Generally speaking, tinnitus does not have a cure so far. Fortunately, there are effective treatments to lower the severity of this condition. Cognitive retraining therapy is among the most effective ways to manage tinnitus related distress.

A Close Look at CGT

This therapy was formed by Dr. Aaron Beck, who realized that inaccurate or distorted beliefs and thoughts were caused by depression and could be treated through cognitive therapy. CRT is based on a model that focuses on the link between thoughts, emotions, and behaviors and offers practical ways to help people.

At its core, cognitive retraining therapy helps solve patients’ problems to improve their sense of well being. It is a major reason why many reputable mental health experts use CRT or CBT to help their patients.

Tinnitus and Cognitive Retraining Therapy

During cognitive retraining therapy sessions, healthcare providers and patients usually work together to spot dysfunctional thoughts and the scenarios they appear in. After that, the provider and patient work to create a formidable, well thought out plan to control their negative reactions. They usually do this by incorporating positive coping techniques that help them shift their attention from tinnitus.

More often than not, cognitive retraining therapy involves around ten to twelve therapy sessions in groups or individually. The goal of each session is to address a particular topic, like a deep dive into what tinnitus is, stress management, sleep hygiene, cognitive restructuring, relaxation, etc. That said, the cognitive retraining process tends to differ for every patient because the therapy is tailored to meet an individual patient’s particular needs.

The theme of utilizing goal oriented techniques to solve problems, responding to negative and dysfunctional thoughts, and modifying negative patterns is the same. Some therapists also implement aspects of other approaches, like mindfulness and acceptance commitment therapy, as these practices complement CRT and CBT.

How Does CRT Help Tinnitus Patients

As most of you know, tinnitus usually stays with people for their entire life. This condition can be quite intrusive and often causes people to think negatively and disrupt their daily lives. Positive thinking isn’t enough to alleviate tinnitus symptoms or ignore them. Instead, it would help if you retrain your mind, which cognitive retraining therapy can help you with.

Best Cognitive Retraining Therapy for tinnitus
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Our thoughts influence how we behave and feel. For instance, getting late for a meeting makes us frustrated, even though it is very little, we can do about it. Merely stop to take a deep breath and realize that all you can do is help change how you behave for the better. Cognitive retraining therapy works similarly, helping us calm down whenever we hear ringing noises.

Cognitive Retraining Therapy: Final Thoughts

If tinnitus is getting in your way and preventing you from living a high quality life, it would be best to look for help. You must avoid listening to non professional advice from anyone who is not a doctor. You can’t afford to try and fix things on your own without the involvement of a doctor because that could worsen your condition and make it difficult for even the best professionals to treat it.

At the tinnitus cognitive center, Stephen Katz knows how to diagnose and choose the most effective treatments on a case by case basis. So, waste no time booking an appointment with us, and we will go above and beyond to ensure you can live a stress free life.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

What Are Sound Disorders?

What are sound disorders? Speech and hearing related health problems are now gaining more awareness among the public. This allows patients and their families to recognize symptoms and get help at earlier stages. A speech sound disorder occurs when a person struggles with producing speech sounds. As a result, they are unable to communicate properly.

What Are Sound Disorders?
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Of course, it is normal for little children to say words incorrectly and find difficulty in communicating their thoughts. But, it should concern you if they struggle to make the correct sounds even past their vocabulary-learning age. Then, you might want to consult a medical professional and seek treatment in a timely manner. Continue reading to learn more about speech sound disorders.

Sound Disorder

Speech sound disorders are simply communication disorders that affect how a person perceives sounds and the way they say them. Generally common in children, people with speech sound disorders experience trouble in making correct sounds and speaking clearly.

Some children even struggle to produce some specific sounds only or find difficulty controlling their voice. Others with sound speech disorders also suffer from speaking problems like stuttering lisp or stutter. In such cases, their speech is so incoherent that people around them are unable to make what the child is trying to say.

A speech sound disorder is not the same as a language disorder. In fact, speech sound disorder only refers to difficulty in making sounds, whereas language disorders involve problems understanding and speaking a language in general. Children with sound disorders do not have any problem with understanding language.

By the age of 8, most children know enough vocabulary to communicate their thoughts effectively. However, if your child still hasn’t mastered the basic words, they may be struggling with a speech sound disorder.

Speech sound disorders involve phonological process disorders and articulation disorders.

  • Phonological process disorder: pattern of sound mistakes such as leaving out certain letters when pronouncing a word.
  • Articulation disorder: problem with producing certain sounds like the ‘sh’ or ‘ch’ sound.

What are the Symptoms of Speech Sound Disorder?

It is normal for children to struggle initially as they learn to speak, but most kids speak very clearly by the time they turn 3. In case a child’s speech is not developing with age, they might be suffering from a speech disorder.

Some common symptoms include:

  • Trouble moving lips, tongue, and jaw
  • Difficulty in making specific sounds
  • Not speaking as well as other children of the same age
  • Not speaking clearly
  • Sudden changes in pitch and volume
  • Nasal or hoarse voice when speaking
  • Panting while talking
  • Stuttering or lisping
  • Struggle with using facial muscles such as while chewing or blowing nose

Although speech sound disorders usually show up during early childhood years, they may also appear later in life.

What Are Sound Disorders | Causes & Treatment
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Signs of articulation disorders include:

  • Skipping certain sounds from words (for example: only saying ‘coo’ while trying to say ‘school)
  • Adding extra sounds to words (for example: saying ‘puhlay’ while trying to say ‘play’)
  • Distorting the pronunciation of words (for example: saying ‘dhith’ while trying to say ‘this’)
  • Swapping letters between words (for example: swapping r in ‘radio’ with w)

Signs of phonological process disorders include:

  • Only saying one syllable in multiple syllable words (for example: saying ‘bay’ while trying to say ‘baby’)
  • Repeating syllables in a word to simplify the word (for example: saying ‘baba’ while trying to say ‘bottle’)
  • Leaving out the sound of consonants in a word (for example: saying ‘at’ while trying to say ‘rat’)
  • Changing the sound of a consonant in words (for example: saying ‘tat’ while trying to say ‘cat’)

What Are Sound Disorders? Conclusion

Speech sound disorders usually appear in the early childhood years, but some adults also show signs later in life. Although the real cause for sound disorders is still unknown, experts believe it has to do with gender, pre and peri-natal problems, and family history. Treatment plans can help patients suffering from articulation and phonological process disorders through the use of different strategies and activities.

The Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ in New York provides excellent sound therapies, with a specialty in tinnitus cognitive retraining therapy and misophonia treatment. Visit Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R, in person or give us a call at 646-213-2321 for an online video consultation with Dr. Katz.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
19 West 34th Street
Penthouse Floor
New York, NY 10001


Call today for a consultation
646-213-2321