Are you Suffering from any of these symptoms as a result of Tinnitus? Call Today for a Consultation.

    Mild to severe anxiety
    Insomnia
    Triggered fight or flight

  Depression
  Negative thinking
  Crying spells

  Hopelessness
  Suicidal thoughts
  Ringing in the ears

Do you feel your family and friends don’t understand?
Are you growing more isolated?
Do you feel like life will never be the same?
Are you refraining from activities that you enjoy?
Are you fearful of losing your job?
Do you find that your thoughts tend to be negative?

If you answered yes to 3 or more of these questions or symptoms, then we can help.

You may be a candidate for Tinnitus Cognitive Retraining Therapy, or TCRT.  Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R, with over 20 years of clinical experience, a New York University graduate, developed Tinnitus Cognitive Retraining Therapy and founded Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ in response to the growing number of Tinnitus sufferers coming to his private practice. He discovered that by helping people to retrain and reinterpret the thoughts around their Tinnitus, anxiety and depression symptoms began to improve. But even more important so did the Tinnitus.

Call us at (646) 213-2321 for a FREE consultation.


See our main site: www.tinnituscognitivecenter.com
Blog Posts are Below:


Tinnitus and Psychology: What’s the Relationship?

Is there a relationship between tinnitus and psychology? Tinnitus is a hearing condition in which the affected person perceives sounds that are unrelated to any external source. This means the sound does not acoustically exist in the outside world. Sufferers of tinnitus define tinnitus as a ringing in the ears. However, some others also experience different hyperboles such as whistling, chirping, buzzing, and in rare cases, even musical sounds.

Tinnitus and Psychology
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The symptoms of tinnitus vary from person to person in numerous ways. For instance, some people hear a distant noise while others claim the sound is present inside their heads. Not to mention, tinnitus can be constant or intermittent and pulsating or steady.

You should seek medical help if tinnitus starts disrupting your lifestyle.

Tinnitus and Psychology

Although it affects around 50 million people in the US alone, tinnitus has few therapeutic measures. In fact, none of the different treatment options can eliminate tinnitus. Hence, tinnitus is a serious concern that manifests co-morbid psychological stress.

According to various studies and surveys,

  • Affective disorders like depressive disorder are prevalent among people suffering from tinnitus. In fact, studies also reveal a correlation between the decrease in depressive and tinnitus symptoms.
  • Anxiety is also high in prevalence among people affected by tinnitus, alongside depression.
  • Personality disorders are also common among tinnitus patients. These include low self-control, type D personality, low psychological acceptance, high-stress reaction, and worsened well-being and social closeness.
  • Tinnitus patients also score high on psychoticism, hostility, and paranoid ideation.
  • Tinnitus also adversely affects executive attention and function, causing cognitive impairment. Affected people also take more time to process and give longer responses.
  • 42% of tinnitus patients also suffer from a somatoform disorder.
  • Insomnia is also common among tinnitus patients as tinnitus sounds become more noticeable at night.

Stress Caused by Tinnitus

By definition, stress is the result of physical or psychological conditions that threaten the normal function of the human body in any way. Usually, stress is associated with difficulty or inability to manage and control a situation. Frequently, experts see stress to be related to tinnitus and other health-related conditions.

Although tinnitus is the result of damage to the auditory system, emotional and psychological factors also prove a significant role. In fact, emotional and mental exhaustion and stress are strong indicators of how intense and severe tinnitus is for a particular person.

Not to mention, many patients also report that their tinnitus worsens during stressful situations. This evidence suggests that stress and tinnitus are related. In fact, statistics show a probable cause-and-effect relationship between the two.

According to observations, tinnitus patients present psychological distress before or during the onset of tinnitus. In fact, the findings of Gomaa et al. reveal that only 25 out of 100 tinnitus patients don’t experience stress.

Tinnitus and Psychology What's the Relationship?
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Tinnitus’ Impact on Quality of Life

Tinnitus largely impinges on an affected person’s quality of life. While some patients only complain about minor annoyance, tinnitus can also result in suicidal attempts in extreme cases. Not only this, but the hearing condition also impairs one’s lifestyle.

For example, you find it hard to focus on work and studies when there are constant ringing sounds in the ears. This results in reduced performance and poor productivity. On the other hand, not getting adequate amounts of sleep and resting properly can cause physical and mental exhaustion.

Not to forget, people also find it hard to hold conversations and interact with others around them due to this hearing condition. This, in turn, also causes emotional difficulties and disruption in social life.

Tinnitus and Psychology: Conclusion

If you think your tinnitus is causing mental health issues for you, you might want to consult a professional. Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R, possesses over 20 years of experience in the field. Visit our Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ or give us a call for a consultation.

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
19 West 34th Street
Penthouse Floor
New York, NY 10001

Call today for a consultation
646-213-2321

Stephen Geller Katz LCSW: Retraining Therapy for Tinnitus

What is retraining therapy for tinnitus? Tinnitus is a very common hearing condition that affects nearly 50 million older adults in the US alone. Tinnitus is more similar to a disease that is associated with various hearing-related health issues as well as other medical conditions.

Retraining Therapy for Tinnitus
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It is characterized by a ringing sound in the ears that happens to have no external source. This suggests that tinnitus is an internal sound that does not exist in the outside world. While the ‘ringing’ sensation is the most common tinnitus sound, many people also hear whistling, buzzing, chirping, etc. Some patients affected by tinnitus also report hearing humming and musical sounds.

Various treatment options help patients cope and live with tinnitus, including sound therapies and cognitive retraining therapy. Let’s see how tinnitus retraining therapy by Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R works.

What is Retraining Therapy for Tinnitus?

Tinnitus can have numerous adverse effects on the overall life quality of the affected person. People who experience intense tinnitus sounds find it hard to focus, affecting productivity. On the other hand, it can also cause sleeping troubles.

Not to mention, tinnitus also affects your mood and ability to communicate. Therefore, it is important to seek treatment for your annoying and debilitating tinnitus.

Tinnitus retraining therapy or TRT is a treatment that seeks to ‘retrain’ your brain to help it cope with your ringing ears. The therapy is practiced at both a conscious and subconscious level as it changes the way your mind, central nervous system, and auditory system perceive, process, and interprets sounds.

TRT is a comprehensive treatment method that addresses the cause behind tinnitus sounds. Then, it recalibrates your internal system to prevent these sounds from ringing in the future. This type of treatment helps numerous people suffering from tinnitus.

If you think you might be experiencing tinnitus, you can use our treatment services at Tinnitus Cognitive Center. A session of TRT requires you to co-operate with a medical professional as only a specialist like Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW, can train your mind.

Such treatment uses counseling and sound therapy methods that spread over 1 to 2 years to tackle all three systems involved effectively. These include the auditory system, limbic system, and autonomic nervous system. Since tinnitus is a complicated symptom and condition, hearing centers offer special personalized treatments as per the specific requirements.

Best Retraining Therapy for Tinnitus
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How Does Tinnitus Retraining Therapy Work?

Tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT) can help minimize the symptoms of different types of tinnitus. These include regular tinnitus, pulsatile tinnitus, tinnitus that causes dizziness, and even bilateral and unilateral tinnitus.

TRT is a brilliant combination of three significant steps at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center. These are:

  1. Data collection: It is hard to identify the causes and prepare the perfect personalized treatment plan without enough patient data. First, we collect information regarding the patient’s medical history and daily lifestyle.
  2. Using sound therapy devices: Sound therapy mechanisms include masking, distraction, habituation, and neuromodulation, using various sound therapy devices. These help the patient’s brain ignore the intensity of tinnitus. The devices distract the patients’ attention from tinnitus sounds using external sounds.
  3. Psychological therapy: Psychological therapy is the main part of tinnitus retraining therapy that retrains the brain. This combines stress management tactics with relaxation exercises that help eliminate any anxiety and stress. As a result, patients stop perceiving tinnitus as a threat.

Tinnitus Retraining Therapy for Tinnitus: Conclusion

Tinnitus retraining therapy, as the name suggests, helps retrain the mind to minimize the intensity of tinnitus sounds. Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™, has 20 years of experience. He provides extensive, compassionate TRT to his patients.

Give us a call at 646-213-2321 to schedule an online session & consultation.

Ringing in the Ears: Is It Tinnitus?

Tinnitus is the sensation of hearing sounds without an external source. Although normally characterized by ringing in the ears, many people also experience buzzing, hissing, chirping, whistling, etc. The sound a person affected by tinnitus hears can vary greatly.

For example, some people may experience constant tinnitus while others suffer from intermittent ringing. Not only this, but people also experience different sounds at different volumes. On the other hand, some people experience pulsating ringing while it is steady for others. You can experience tinnitus in one or both ears or even inside your head.

Ringing in the Ears Is It Tinnitus?
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This common hearing condition affects around 50 million people in the US, particularly adults. Though not a serious health risk, it can often affect their quality of life. So, let’s see how you can find whether you have tinnitus. Then, you might need to see a medical professional for tinnitus treatment.

1.    Symptoms/ Causes/ Health Conditions

In case you’re wondering whether you’re suffering from tinnitus, start by evaluating the symptoms that you’re experiencing. Do you hear sounds that are not coming from your surrounding environment? If so, then what are the sounds like? People with tinnitus tend to hear multiple sounds ranging from ringing to humming.

Then, see where it’s taking place. Can you feel it in both your ears or just one of them? Are the sounds steady or pulsating? You might have pulsatile tinnitus if you experience a heartbeat in your ear in conditions with low background noise.

Also, evaluate the causes that might be contributing to the ringing sound in your ears. For example, conditions such as ear blockage, ear infection, Meniere’s disease, high blood pressure, and diabetes can trigger tinnitus. Certain medications and head and neck injuries can also largely contribute to the development of tinnitus.

Other health conditions associated with tinnitus include depression, sleeping problems, anxiety, hyperacusis, etc.

Ringing in the Ears Is It Tinnitus?
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2.    Frequency

The frequency of your symptoms plays a great role in determining whether or not you’re affected by tinnitus. Generally, most people experience tinnitus at some point when they are exposed to loud noise. For example, your ears might ring for a day or two after attending a concert. This suggests that tinnitus is usually not a serious health concern.

So, considering the frequency is an important factor. Try and notice how often you hear a noise in your head or ear(s). Or, does it only occur in certain conditions, such as while listening to music? Sometimes, the condition is only temporary, but it can also prevail for as long as over 15 years. So, it is important to identify if something specifically triggers tinnitus for you.

A specific situation like loud noise or a certain atmosphere causing tinnitus in your ears should not be problematic. However, treatment is necessary if you frequently experience symptoms of tinnitus. Tinnitus that prevails for longer than six months may be chronic, affecting the quality of life. Furthermore, it can also be a sign of nerve damage or a tumor.

3.    Influence

It is also important to consider how chronic tinnitus affects your life. It can largely affect your overall well being, mood, sleeping habits, ability to concentrate, etc. Tinnitus is also associated with psychological health conditions such as anxiety and depression. You can better assess your tinnitus situation by asking yourself the following questions:

  • Does your tinnitus affect how you enjoy your life?
  • Are you facing difficulty sleeping due to the constant ringing in your ears at night?
  • Do you find it hard to relax and stay calm because of tinnitus?
  • Does it interfere with your work life and overall productivity?

Ringing in the Ears is it tinnitus? Bottom Line

A hearing test can help if you have tinnitus symptoms for more than a few days after hearing a loud noise. If you’re looking to get your hearing checked, visit the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™. Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R, offers excellent tinnitus therapy to his patients. 

Give us a call today!

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
19 West 34th Street
Penthouse Floor
New York, NY 10001
646-213-2321

Latest Data on Tinnitus

What is some of the latest data on tinnitus? Many people, especially adults, experience the tinnitus symptoms. In fact, an estimated number of 3.4 million people suffer from tinnitus. Not to forget, 56.1 percent of these adults are experiencing tinnitus for more than 5 years. On the other hand, tinnitus is affecting the remaining for over 15 years.

Latest Data on Tinnitus
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While tinnitus can affect people of all ages, adults mostly fall victim to this hearing condition. You can notice a direct correlation between increased severity of symptoms and people over the age of 51. Let’s see what tinnitus really is and whether you need to see a doctor for your tinnitus.

What is Tinnitus?

Simply put, tinnitus is a hearing condition that affects a person’s ability to hear a sound that has no external source. Normally, we are able to hear and recognize sounds when a certain thing in our surrounding environment sends sound waves towards our eardrums.

However, people suffering from tinnitus can hear sounds that do not have an external source. Many people happen to hear a ringing sound in their head whereas others also experience sounds like roaring, chirping, hissing, whistling, and humming, etc.

If you’re suffering from tinnitus, you might hear such sounds in one or both your ears, or even inside your head. Some with tinnitus can hear a sound coming from a distance. The sound(s) can be intermittent, constant, or pulsating. In fact, the symptom can vary from person to person.

More often than not, symptoms of tinnitus are very subjective but it can also be objective at times. This means that other people are also able to hear your tinnitus with you. For example, you might be hearing a whooshing sound in case you have a heart murmur. So, your doctors can hear such tinnitus with the help of a stethoscope.

One common type of tinnitus is pulsatile tinnitus that normally affects older adults. Pulsatile tinnitus is characterized by a heartbeat in the ears that usually becomes more prominent and noticeable during the night. In case you experience pulsatile tinnitus in your bed at night, consult a doctor for a tinnitus checkup. This type of tinnitus in older people can also be a sign of blood vessel damage or even a tumor.

What Causes Tinnitus?

Although tinnitus can affect people for long periods of time, almost everyone experiences it at some point of their life. You may experience symptoms of tinnitus for a short time after you’re exposed to loud noise, like at a concert or a party. This type of short term tinnitus can go on for 2 to 3 days.

Latest Data on Tinnitus
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Other common causes for tinnitus are:

Hearing Loss

Your inner ears have small hair cells called cochlea that move when met with sound waves. As your ear receives sound waves and movement of cochlea takes place, ears send electrical signals along the auditory nerve towards your brain. You are finally able to hear when the brain interprets these signals. Tinnitus can be a symptom of hearing loss if you have a broken or bent cochlea.

Ear canal blockage or infection

Ear canal blockage and ear infection can both contribute to tinnitus. Cerumen or fluid buildup from an ear infection can block your ear canal creating pressure in your ear. As a result, you might experience symptoms of tinnitus.

Head and neck injuries

Oftentimes, an injury of the head or neck can damage your ear and associated parts and functions. It can affect your inner ear, brain function that is linked to hearing, and auditory nerves. Such injuries can lead to tinnitus, usually in one ear only.

Medications

Tinnitus can also be a result of certain medications. Various medications can trigger or worsen tinnitus, especially in case of high doses. These medicines normally include NSAIDs, diuretics, antibiotics, antidepressants, and cancer drugs.

Latest Data on Tinnitus: Bottom Line

Although tinnitus does not indicate a serious health risk in most cases, it can also be associated with nerve damage or tumor. Therefore, it is important to seek professional medical help if your symptoms of tinnitus prevail longer than a few days.

If you’re looking for the top tinnitus treatment specialist in New York, speak with  Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™. Dr. Katz possesses over 20 years of clinical patient experience and provides excellent Tinnitus Cognitive Retraining Therapy.

Call Dr. Katz and schedule an online tele-session today:

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
19 West 34th Street
Penthouse Floor
New York, NY 10001
646-213-2321

COVID and Tinnitus: Is There a Relationship?

Often referred to as ringing in the ears, tinnitus is another condition where research is needed to explore its relationship with COVID-19. As patients recover from the fatal viral infection, many report tinnitus symptoms. Although tinnitus is not directly considered a symptom of COVID-19, the post-COVID condition affects many patients.

COVID and Tinnitus Is There a Relationship?
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A systematic review regarding ear health symptoms of COVID suggests that nearly 15% of recovering patients experience tinnitus. While the connection between the two health conditions is still unclear, some factors can serve as clues. Continue reading to learn more about COVID and tinnitus and if the two are interlinked.

What is Tinnitus, Exactly?

Typically, tinnitus refers to a hearing condition in which an affected person hears sounds that do not exist around them. Some experts also describe it as a perception of sound that has no external source.

While ringing in the ear is the most common sound that most tinnitus patients experience, it can also be present in other sounds like buzzing, chirping, whistling, etc. In some rare cases, tinnitus can also occur in the form of music.

The unpleasant sensational hearing condition is extremely common worldwide, especially among older adults. Around 50 million adults suffer from tinnitus. According to various surveys, more than half of the adults suffering from tinnitus have done so for over five years. The timeframe for the disease shows that it is a chronic condition. Many conditions can trigger and worsen tinnitus; is COVID-19 one? We will discuss this further in this piece.

Not to mention, all humans experience short-term tinnitus at some point, according to the American Tinnitus Association. This is mostly due to exposure to loud noise. For example, you might experience tinnitus after attending a concert. In such cases, the condition should go away by itself, but you must seek medical help if tinnitus prevails for a long time.

Does COVID-19 Cause Tinnitus?

Many people still wonder whether tinnitus and hearing loss can be associated with COVID-19 and other viral infections. Let’s have a look at what we know.

Much remains undiscovered regarding the adverse effects of COVID-19 on human health. According to experts, COVID-19 does affect other organs of the body apart from the respiratory system.

COVID and Tinnitus Treatment
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For starters, SARS-CoV-2 can link to tinnitus and other hearing-related health issues. This is especially logical when the viral infection already causes so many symptoms affecting the upper respiratory system. This can especially put pressure on the ears and cause tinnitus. However, experts believe this is more likely the case with the Delta variant of COVID.

Nevertheless, patients have reported tinnitus as a symptom since the pandemic’s beginning. One group of researchers even looked into the matter to search for audio-vestibular symptoms of COVID. However, the results did not show any relation between tinnitus and severe acute respiratory syndrome.

But a return to the research in December 2020 revealed:

  • An estimated 7.6% of patients reporting hear loss
  • An estimated 14.8% of people report tinnitus
  • An estimated 7.2% of people reporting vertigo

This evidence suggests that COVID-19 can have a relationship with audio-vestibular conditions. The American Academy of Audiology, the Academy of Doctors Audiology, and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Associated revealed these statistics. Along with publishing the results, the study also conveyed the need for further studies that are yet to come.

COVID and Tinnitus: Conclusion

It is hard to confirm whether tinnitus is a direct symptom of COVID-19 infection but there sure is a connection between the two. This is evident in the high reporting rates. Regardless, tinnitus can be annoying and debilitating, so consulting a medical professional will help.

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
19 West 34th Street
Penthouse Floor
New York, NY 10001

Call today for a consultation
646-213-2321

Common Treatments for Tinnitus

What are some common treatments for tinnitus? Tinnitus is a hearing condition that affects millions of people all around the world. In the US alone, 50 million adults suffer from tinnitus. While tinnitus can affect people of all ages, it is most common among adults older than 50 years of age.

Common Treatments for Tinnitus

Moreover, adults usually experience the chronic form of tinnitus due to several aging related health conditions. In fact, various studies reveal that more than half of the adults affected by tinnitus have been experiencing tinnitus sounds for over 5 years.

Tinnitus Diagnosis and Treatment

Your medical professional will typically run a diagnosis based on your symptoms. However, tinnitus can also often be a sign of underlying health conditions. So your doctor might also conduct the following tests:

  • Hearing exam: Hearing loss is the most common cause of tinnitus, so a hearing test can help identify that.
  • Movement: Lips, tongue, or jaw disorders can also cause tinnitus. Movement tests can help identify underlying disorders that need treatment.
  • Imaging: If your doctor suspects a certain cause, they may need imaging tests such as CT or MRI scans.
  • Labs: Drawing and testing blood is essential to look for thyroid problems, anemia, or vitamin deficiencies.

Tinnitus treatment typically depends on the cause behind your tinnitus. Common treatments include:

  • Earwax removal: Cerumen (earwax) buildup can trigger tinnitus for many, so removal can prove significant.
  • Treating blood vessels: Damaged, bent or hardened vessels can lead to tinnitus in one or both ears. So, treatment of blood vessels can largely help address your tinnitus problem.
  • Hearing aids: Hearing aids may help if your tinnitus is a result of age related or noise induced hearing loss.
  • Changing medications: tinnitus can also often be a side effect of certain medications, such as cancer drugs. Changing the medication should ease tinnitus in such cases.

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Sound Therapy

There are four general mechanisms of sound therapy that work to suppress tinnitus sounds:

  • Masking: Masking is a form of sound therapy that uses sound maskers to cover up or ‘mask’ the sounds of tinnitus.
  • Distraction: Distraction uses pleasant external sounds to distract a person from tinnitus sounds.
  • Habituation: The practice of habituation trains the mind to disregard tinnitus sounds as unimportant noise.
  • Neuromodulation: Neuromodulation also makes use of specialized external sounds that rewire the brain to minimize neural hyperactivity.

Counseling

Counseling refers to behavioral treatment options that help affected people in coping and live with tinnitus. It seeks to change the way a person thinks about tinnitus, reducing anxiety and stress associated with stress. This way, tinnitus sounds no longer affect your productivity, mood, or concentration.

Best Common Treatments for Tinnitus

Common options include:

Tinnitus Retraining Therapy (TRT)

Tinnitus retraining therapy is a personalized treatment program that requires brilliant cooperation between a medical professional and the patient. TRT uses a combination of treatment methods such as sound therapies and counseling from trained professionals. Over time, tinnitus becomes less annoying and debilitating through tinnitus retraining therapy.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive behavioral therapy is another form of counseling that involves a licensed mental health professional helping you cope with tinnitus. The medical professional counsels and teaches techniques that can make the symptoms of tinnitus less noticeable and bothersome.

Common Treatments for Tinnitus: Conclusion

Tinnitus is a hearing related condition in which a person perceives sounds that do not exist in the external world. Constant ringing in the ears can have various adverse effects on the quality of life. So, seeking medical help can prove significant in enjoying life again.

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ in New York has over 20 years of experience in providing excellent TRT. Schedule a convenient online session with Dr. Katz today.

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
19 West 34th Street
Penthouse Floor
New York, NY 10001

Call today for a consultation
646-213-2321

Common Tinnitus Sounds

What are the most common tinnitus sounds? Many people around the world suffer from tinnitus, with 50 million adults in the US alone. Although people of different ages experience tinnitus at least once in their lifetime, it is most common in older adults. In fact, studies suggest that more than half of the affected people are adults over the age of 50. Not to mention, most of these people have suffered from this hearing condition for more than 5 years.

Common Tinnitus Sounds
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Let’s learn more about tinnitus and the most common sounds that tinnitus patients report hearing.

What is Tinnitus?

Tinnitus is a common hearing condition in which the affected person hears sounds without an external source. This means that the sounds an affected person hears do not actually exist in the external world. You might be suffering from tinnitus if you think you hear sounds that others around you don’t.

Different people experience sounds of different quality, types, frequencies, and degrees of loudness. While most people report ringing in the ears, others also complain about whistling, chirping, hissing sounds, etc. That is not all; the sounds can be all steady or pulsating and intermittent or constant.

Not to forget, people’s experiences of tinnitus also differ from one another in terms of where they feel the sound the most. Some people hear the tinnitus sounds inside their head, while another affected person might hear distant tinnitus sounds. Furthermore, tinnitus can be both bilateral (ringing in both ears) and unilateral (ringing in one ear only).

Typically, tinnitus is most common among people with hearing loss. However, the main cause of tinnitus is uncertain. Besides, tinnitus can also be a result of various health issues and other conditions such as:

  • Cancer or tumor
  • Certain medications
  • Jaw joint dysfunction
  • Wax buildup
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Chronic neck muscle strain
  • Head and neck injuries
  • Head and neck tumors and cancers
  • Benign cysts
  • Meniere’s disease

You might also experience tinnitus after being exposed to loud music. For example, attending a concert can trigger tinnitus for you. This should go away in a few days. However, treatment is necessary for tinnitus that prevails for long periods of time.

Types of Sounds

The experience of hearing tinnitus sounds varies from person to person. While some people experience one sound throughout their tinnitus, these sounds variably change and intertwine for others. People hear various sounds such as ringing, whooshing, sirens, static, roaring, pulsing, screeching, hissing, clicking, ocean waves, hissing, dial tones, etc. In rare cases, affected people also report hearing music and humming.

Each person experiences tinnitus differently with such a wide range of sound variety in tinnitus. At Tinnitus Cognitive Center, we understand that such differences require support, and we provide exactly that with our excellent treatment services.

Most Common Tinnitus Sounds Treatment
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Cases of tinnitus range from mild to severe, with people experiencing different intensities of sounds. Although the number of tinnitus sounds is uncertain, it largely depends on the type of tinnitus a person has.

The Four Different Types of Tinnitus based on Sounds

The four different types of sounds based on the variety of sounds are:

  • Subjective Tinnitus: The most common type of tinnitus, subjective tinnitus is usually a result of exposure to excessively loud noise. Generally, it may last for up to a year or even never stops in severe cases.
  • Neurological Tinnitus: Neurological Tinnitus is usually a symptom of other health disorders like Meniere’s disease. The latter affects the primary auditory functions of the brain.
  • Somatic Tinnitus: Somatic Tinnitus is associated with the body’s sensory system.
  • Objective Tinnitus: Objective Tinnitus is a rare type of tinnitus that is usually a result of vascular deformities or involuntary muscle contraction.

Common Tinnitus Sounds: Conclusion

Tinnitus sounds vary from person to person. However, they may depend on the four types of tinnitus: subjective tinnitus, neurological tinnitus, somatic tinnitus, and objective tinnitus.

If you think you might be experiencing tinnitus, you can visit us at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ in New York. Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R has over 20 years of experience and provides effective tinnitus retraining therapy. Give Stephen Katz a call today to book an online session and begin relieving yourself of this condition.

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

tinnituscognitivecenter.com

Stephen Geller Katz: Tinnitus Retraining Therapy

Tinnitus retraining therapy, or TRT, is rapidly becoming the most effective way to treat the sound disorder known as tinnitus. Currently, experts and scientists are busy searching for an effective permanent cure for tinnitus and associated sound disorders. While there are no instant cures for tinnitus, there are other remedial solutions that relate to medical treatments, counseling, and different forms of therapies. One of them includes tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT), which involves helping affected patients endure tinnitus noises and other symptoms.

Before we learn more about this treatment option, let’s understand tinnitus and its complications in a comprehensible manner.

Comprehending Tinnitus and it’s Complications

Tinnitus primarily refers to a sound disorder in which you experience constant ringing, or any other type of disturbing sounds, in your ears. This constant noise can occur in one year but most commonly affects both. Patients mention that they initially try to determine any external sources of these disturbing sounds and noises at which they absolutely fail.

Tinnitus Retraining Therapy Expert Inventor Katz

This is true, considering that the problem occurs internally. Tinnitus noises occur due to musculoskeletal and cardiovascular movements, which ultimately affect the ears, blood vessels, etc. Symptoms besides constant buzzing and ringing in the ears include:

  • Clicking
  • Whistling
  • Whooshing
  • Hissing
  • Humming
  • Roaring

Since there aren’t any external sources of sound near your head, experts regard these noises as “phantom sounds.” It can be disturbing and frustrating to experience constant noises in your ears without any prominent sound source. These can interfere with real interactions that involve making a speech, performing actions, and concentrating based on sound. Furthermore, people with persistent tinnitus suffer from anxiety, stress, and depression. While this condition can occur in anyone despite their age, gender, and underlying medical conditions, it is more prevalent in people of older age.

What are the Main Causes of Tinnitus?

Exposure to loud sounds consistently or in a sudden accident such as a blast, shatter, etc., can cause tinnitus

Auditory nerve tumors can result in tinnitus. This is when it affects the bones in the ear, mainly the middle ear area, which can adversely affect sound conduction.

Jobs that involve working with loud equipment or under loud environments can result in the manifestation of tinnitus. For example, those working as musicians, construction workers, and in other loud sound jobs are more susceptible to tinnitus.

Medications of certain types and makes can have a negative impact on the health of your middle and inner ears.

Some health conditions also cause and lead to tinnitus in one or both of the ears. Here are some:

  • Meniere’s disease
  • Blood pressure disorders
  • Cholesterol problems
  • Hearing loss
  • Temporomandibular Joint Disorders
  • Injuries to the neck, head, and ear

Tinnitus Retraining Therapy

Tinnitus retraining therapy is a common and highly regarded treatment option for tinnitus and its rare types. In simple words, tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT) is a habituation therapy that helps people cope with constantly disturbing noises such as ringing, buzzing, whooshing, etc. These sounds persist even when there is no external source for them. TRT involves directive counseling, which aims to help the patients regard tinnitus noises as neutral sounds/signals. Consequently, tinnitus-affected people are able to ignore the sounds.

Another important component of TRT is sound therapy, which involves masking and reducing the impact or awareness of tinnitus noises. Sound therapy introduces patients to various ear-related devices, such as hearing aids, white noise-reducing machines, brown noise-blocking machines, and other noise blockers. By reducing the noise level, you become less aware of the tinnitus issue. In reality, combining these two components (directive counseling and sound therapy) can result in an effective solution against tinnitus.

Tinnitus Retraining Therapy TRT Specialist Stephen Katz

Other Treatment Options for Tinnitus

Here are some other common treatments and remedial options that help lessen the impact and adversities of tinnitus in people.

Cochlear Implants

These aim to restore hearing function. These devices bypass the most damaged ear parts, allowing better hearing. It comprises an implanted microphone that goes over your ear. It has a set electrode in the inner ear, which helps conduct sounds and enables better hearing function.

These devices work primarily over electrical stimulation, which lets the brain interpret noises and sounds adequately. In short, cochlear implants are effective in producing electrical signals through the auditory nerves that your brain uses to process noises and sounds.

Lifestyle Improvement

You can try reducing stress levels to limit the occurrence of tinnitus noises or at least preventing them from worsening it. Stress doesn’t directly cause tinnitus but rather affects the way tinnitus noises occur. Therefore, too much stress can give rise to noises and worsen tinnitus.

Prescriptions/Medication

Certain types of medication are also effective in ruling out symptoms of tinnitus. Medication can help alleviate the effect and pain of tinnitus symptoms at the most.

Tinnitus Retraining Therapy: Conclusion

You can procure the best tinnitus retraining therapy at the hands of one of the top tinnitus treatment specialists in the USA.  Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™, helps patients in dealing with tinnitus, sound disorders, and misophonia.

Dr. Katz is a highly experienced expert in treating & in some cases curing tinnitus. Call to book an easy online session today.

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321


Reference Links

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25862626/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5562945/
https://www.medicinenet.com/ringing_in_ears/symptoms.htm
https://www.healthyhearing.com/report/52999-Tinnitus-sound-therapy-retraining-the-way-the-brain-perceives-sound

Tinnitus & Sound Disorders | Buzzing in the Ears

Tinnitus refers to a prevalent hearing disorder in which you hear strange and constant noises such as ringing, buzzing, whooshing, and so on in the ears. You might hear these strange, debilitating sounds constantly in one or both of your ears. However, you may not be able to find an external source for these sounds. This condition is “tinnitus.” Better known as “ringing in the year,” it occurs internally due to musculoskeletal or cardiovascular movement.

Tinnitus and Sound Disorders-Buzzing in the Ears

While these sounds cause you anxiety, depression, pain, and stress, people around you might not even get a hint of the sound. Experts refer to this type as “subjective tinnitus.” On the other hand, if people in close proximity to you can listen or feel the sound closely, experts call it “objective tinnitus.” Although it is usually a sign of aging, it can occur due to underlying serious medical issues as well.

Symptoms of Tinnitus and Sound Disorders

The most common symptom of tinnitus that many people mention is ringing in the ears. Nevertheless, there is a broad range of these strange noises and sounds that can affect your daily life. Here are some:

  • Roaring
  • Clicking
  • Whistling
  • Buzzing
  • Whooshing
  • Humming
  • Hissing

Normally, people affected with tinnitus experience the subjective type, in which they are the only ones who can hear these constant noises and sounds. These noises range between high and low in terms of pitches. Often, they may be as disturbing as a constantly high-pitched squeal. Therefore, you may understand how devastating their impact on a person’s lifestyle may be. The sounds can be loud enough to obstruct your concentration and rest. In some cases, they may interfere with your ability to hear external sounds.

Rare cases of sound disorders and tinnitus can result in whooshing and rhythmic pulsing noises. This occurs in a type of tinnitus known as “pulsatile tinnitus.” The noise, in this case, beats rhythmically with your pulse and may also be perceivable by another person examining you.

General Causes of Tinnitus and Sound Disorders | Buzzing in the Ear

There are various health conditions that experts believe lead to hearing loss and tinnitus alike. While there is no concrete evidence as to how these interconnect, they do affect tinnitus and worsen it in many cases. The general causes include:

  • Hearing loss: Cochlea deformity due to several medical reasons, including any accidents or injuries.
  • Ear infections: Probably due to ear wax buildup or bacteria accumulation that harms the health of the inner parts of one or both of your ears.
  • Medications: Specific medicinal drugs have a health effect that often impacts your ears’ inner condition adversely. Consulting your previous medications with your doctor can help to determine whether it is a cause of tinnitus in your ear.
  • Neck and head injuries: These pertain to damage to the internal sound-sensitive organs in one or both of your ears which results in hearing disability and tinnitus.

When is Immediate Medical Care Imperative?

You might not know when your hearing has worsened until you experience chronic symptoms. Speaking of sound disorders like tinnitus, you should know the right time to procure medical attention. While it is best to seek early treatments and diagnosis when experiencing acute to mild symptoms, you should seek medical care when the sounds become constant, high-pitched, frequent, and/or vary in pattern.

Furthermore, if tinnitus is starting to affect your daily life, such as when you are not able to comprehend external sounds, concentrate, or suffer from anxiety (or any other psychological issue), you should seek medical care.

In addition, if you feel dizzy, light-headed, or become depressed, you should immediately see a medical expert for quick treatment and long-term evaluation.

What Treatments are Available for Sound Disorders and Tinnitus?

Medication

Your doctor might prescribe antibiotic ear drops, anti-inflammatory pills/ear drops, and similar medication to help alleviate the discomfort and symptoms. Though, remember that tinnitus is mostly incurable, so you can’t expect the medication to cure it instantly. Aside from that, your doctor may also advise prescription drugs to counter anxiety and depression.

Buzzing in the Ears | Tinnitus Sound Disorders

TRT (Tinnitus Retraining Therapy)

TRT treatment works in conjunction with and presence of an audiologist who is an auditory expert. The main concept of this treatment method is to combine the most effective approaches: professional counseling and the use of sound-minimizing/masking devices along. The sound masking decreases your attention and bothersome awareness towards tinnitus noises, while the directive counseling helps you ignore them.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

CBT Therapy is also a form of counseling that requires a trained psychologist or similar professional. They help you define your thought process on tinnitus noises that leads to anger, anxiety, depression, and other effects. From then on, they help you construct a thought process of your own that is less bothered by tinnitus noises. Hence, you ignore the noises and perceive them as neutral sounds.

Buzzing in the Ears: Conclusion

Are you or a loved one currently experiencing tinnitus symptoms? If so, you should get in touch with Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™, who specializes in dealing with tinnitus and related health conditions.

Give us a call to set an appointment for an online consultation or treatment today. 

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
19 West 34th Street
Penthouse Floor
New York, NY 10001
646-213-2321

 


Reference Links:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/tinnitus/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20350162
https://www.nhsinform.scot/illnesses-and-conditions/ears-nose-and-throat/tinnitus
https://www.msdmanuals.com/home/ear,-nose,-and-throat-disorders/symptoms-of-ear-disorders/ear-ringing-or-buzzing
https://familydoctor.org/condition/tinnitus/

Ringing in the Ears: Do you Have Tinnitus?

If you struggle with the condition of a constant ringing sound in your ears, you already know that it can be annoying and frustrating. Although this ringing or buzzing in the ears is not a cause of concern most of the time, constantly experiencing it without any probable cause might require medical attention.

Ringing in the Ears | Tinnitus Treatment

Experts refer to this condition as “tinnitus,” whereas many people call it “a condition in which you hear ringing or buzzing noises in one or both of your ears”.

What is Ringing in the Ears (Tinnitus)?

Tinnitus is the occurrence of strange and obscure noises in your ears without a prominent cause. While we perceive sound normally through external sources, tinnitus is different. In this condition, the constant noise does not occur due to an external source. Rather, you hear noises because of an underlying internal issue. Still, you should not consider it more than sound disorder even though it is incurable most of the time.

Subjective tinnitus occurs when only the affected person can hear these strange and consistent noises in their ears. Conversely, objective tinnitus refers to when the people closely around the affected person may also perceive these sounds, but at a lower intensity. Note that objective tinnitus is rare and occurs in only 1% of all tinnitus patients. The noises are a result of musculoskeletal or cardiovascular movements within the body. Take a look at some of the general symptoms of tinnitus.

Symptoms

  • Roaring sounds
  • Whooshing sounds
  • Whistling noises
  • Hissing
  • Headaches
  • Sleep disturbance
  • Dizziness

What Leads to Ringing in the Ears (Tinnitus)?

For one, tinnitus may occur due to excessively loud sounds exposure. It is the case with most affected people and continues to persist. Moreover, it can cause noise-induced hearing impairment or even hearing loss. Loud sounds tend to destroy and adversely affect the condition of sound-sensitive cells in your ear’s cochlea, which is a spiral-shaped organ.

People who work jobs involving loud sounds or noises, such as musicians, construction workers, and factory workers, are at a higher risk of developing tinnitus. In addition, an abrupt exposure to loud noise can also manifest tinnitus in a healthy individual.

Health Conditions Leading to Tinnitus

Tumor if the auditory nerve

  • Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome affects the jaw, neck, and nearby areas of the ears
  • Ear clogs due to excessive wax buildup
  • Otosclerosis causes the small middle ear bones to become stiff
  • Menier’s disease leads to the deterioration of parts of the inner ear
  • Certain medications can harm the health of ears and their internal organs, so consult your healthcare provider to make sure don’t expose yourself to such threats
  • Neck and head accidents/injuries
  • Blood pressure disorders
  • Cardiovascular diseases and disorders
  • The aging process reflects poorly on the health of ears and the internal sound-sensitive cells and organs
  • Anemia, allergies, underactive or overactive thyroid gland, diabetes, etc.

Leaving the condition unaffected can lead to chronic progression of tinnitus, which may not be tolerable later on. Therefore, is best to seek medical attention to identify the underlying cause of tinnitus for effective treatment.

Tinnitus Ringing in Ears | Sound Disorder Treatment

What Treatments Might Help You with Ringing in the Ear (Tinnitus)?

Therapies

Therapies can help a patient with tinnitus feel less bothered or obstructed by the constant ringing or other forms of sounds. Therapies aim to establish a new thought process. They allow patients to view the symptoms of tinnitus from a different outlook. Hence, while they may not feel comfortable with the condition, they surely feel less concerned due to them.

Sound Therapies

There are various types of therapies that can help people with tinnitus enjoy their life and live with fewer disturbances. Sound therapy helps reduce the constant noise and sounds due to tinnitus. These therapies involve the use of sound devices that mask the constant ringing with external sounds. Such devices can include hearing aids, white noise machines, and masking devices.

However, the sound being external should be pleasant to hear. Otherwise, the whole purpose of it will remain unfulfilled. Furthermore, these therapies offer temporary relief. It means that once you take the devices off, tinnitus symptoms are bound to return.

CBT (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy)

While CBT doesn’t offer an outright solution to the tinnitus ringing and buzzing sounds, it offers comfort and relief with associated symptoms. CBT aims to reassure patients that tinnitus is a medical condition that doesn’t have a cure. By enhancing thinking and developing better behavioral patterns, an affected individual can learn to ignore these sounds.

TRT (Tinnitus Retraining Therapy)

TRT therapy involves perceiving the disturbing sounds and noises as normal. What does this mean? The therapy will involve the use of devices and trained professional’s advice to rethink the noises as normal external noises, which will help the patient cope with the severity and resume their daily life.

Ringing in the Ears & Tinnitus: Conclusion

If you aim to find the most effective tinnitus solutions and healthcare, you should get in touch with Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™. Dr. Katz is a world renowned tinnitus specialist who has successfully treated thousands of patients suffering from sound disorders such as tinnitus. Call Stephen today for a consultation and to schedule a convenient online session from anywhere in the world.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R

19 West 34th Street
Penthouse Floor
New York, NY 10001

Call today for a consultation
646-213-2321

 

 


Reference Links:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/tinnitus-ringing-in-the-ears-and-what-to-do-about-it
https://www.healthline.com/health/tinnitus
https://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/tinnitus
https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/tinnitus-triggers

Tinnitus and Psychology: What’s the Relationship?

Is there a relationship between tinnitus and psychology? Tinnitus is a hearing condition in which the affected person perceives sounds that are unrelated to any external source. This means the sound does not acoustically exist in the outside world. Sufferers of tinnitus define tinnitus as a ringing in the ears. However, some others also experience different hyperboles such as whistling, chirping, buzzing, and in rare cases, even musical sounds.

Tinnitus and Psychology
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The symptoms of tinnitus vary from person to person in numerous ways. For instance, some people hear a distant noise while others claim the sound is present inside their heads. Not to mention, tinnitus can be constant or intermittent and pulsating or steady.

You should seek medical help if tinnitus starts disrupting your lifestyle.

Tinnitus and Psychology

Although it affects around 50 million people in the US alone, tinnitus has few therapeutic measures. In fact, none of the different treatment options can eliminate tinnitus. Hence, tinnitus is a serious concern that manifests co-morbid psychological stress.

According to various studies and surveys,

  • Affective disorders like depressive disorder are prevalent among people suffering from tinnitus. In fact, studies also reveal a correlation between the decrease in depressive and tinnitus symptoms.
  • Anxiety is also high in prevalence among people affected by tinnitus, alongside depression.
  • Personality disorders are also common among tinnitus patients. These include low self-control, type D personality, low psychological acceptance, high-stress reaction, and worsened well-being and social closeness.
  • Tinnitus patients also score high on psychoticism, hostility, and paranoid ideation.
  • Tinnitus also adversely affects executive attention and function, causing cognitive impairment. Affected people also take more time to process and give longer responses.
  • 42% of tinnitus patients also suffer from a somatoform disorder.
  • Insomnia is also common among tinnitus patients as tinnitus sounds become more noticeable at night.

Stress Caused by Tinnitus

By definition, stress is the result of physical or psychological conditions that threaten the normal function of the human body in any way. Usually, stress is associated with difficulty or inability to manage and control a situation. Frequently, experts see stress to be related to tinnitus and other health-related conditions.

Although tinnitus is the result of damage to the auditory system, emotional and psychological factors also prove a significant role. In fact, emotional and mental exhaustion and stress are strong indicators of how intense and severe tinnitus is for a particular person.

Not to mention, many patients also report that their tinnitus worsens during stressful situations. This evidence suggests that stress and tinnitus are related. In fact, statistics show a probable cause-and-effect relationship between the two.

According to observations, tinnitus patients present psychological distress before or during the onset of tinnitus. In fact, the findings of Gomaa et al. reveal that only 25 out of 100 tinnitus patients don’t experience stress.

Tinnitus and Psychology What's the Relationship?
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Tinnitus’ Impact on Quality of Life

Tinnitus largely impinges on an affected person’s quality of life. While some patients only complain about minor annoyance, tinnitus can also result in suicidal attempts in extreme cases. Not only this, but the hearing condition also impairs one’s lifestyle.

For example, you find it hard to focus on work and studies when there are constant ringing sounds in the ears. This results in reduced performance and poor productivity. On the other hand, not getting adequate amounts of sleep and resting properly can cause physical and mental exhaustion.

Not to forget, people also find it hard to hold conversations and interact with others around them due to this hearing condition. This, in turn, also causes emotional difficulties and disruption in social life.

Tinnitus and Psychology: Conclusion

If you think your tinnitus is causing mental health issues for you, you might want to consult a professional. Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R, possesses over 20 years of experience in the field. Visit our Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ or give us a call for a consultation.

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
19 West 34th Street
Penthouse Floor
New York, NY 10001

Call today for a consultation
646-213-2321

Stephen Geller Katz LCSW: Retraining Therapy for Tinnitus

What is retraining therapy for tinnitus? Tinnitus is a very common hearing condition that affects nearly 50 million older adults in the US alone. Tinnitus is more similar to a disease that is associated with various hearing-related health issues as well as other medical conditions.

Retraining Therapy for Tinnitus
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It is characterized by a ringing sound in the ears that happens to have no external source. This suggests that tinnitus is an internal sound that does not exist in the outside world. While the ‘ringing’ sensation is the most common tinnitus sound, many people also hear whistling, buzzing, chirping, etc. Some patients affected by tinnitus also report hearing humming and musical sounds.

Various treatment options help patients cope and live with tinnitus, including sound therapies and cognitive retraining therapy. Let’s see how tinnitus retraining therapy by Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R works.

What is Retraining Therapy for Tinnitus?

Tinnitus can have numerous adverse effects on the overall life quality of the affected person. People who experience intense tinnitus sounds find it hard to focus, affecting productivity. On the other hand, it can also cause sleeping troubles.

Not to mention, tinnitus also affects your mood and ability to communicate. Therefore, it is important to seek treatment for your annoying and debilitating tinnitus.

Tinnitus retraining therapy or TRT is a treatment that seeks to ‘retrain’ your brain to help it cope with your ringing ears. The therapy is practiced at both a conscious and subconscious level as it changes the way your mind, central nervous system, and auditory system perceive, process, and interprets sounds.

TRT is a comprehensive treatment method that addresses the cause behind tinnitus sounds. Then, it recalibrates your internal system to prevent these sounds from ringing in the future. This type of treatment helps numerous people suffering from tinnitus.

If you think you might be experiencing tinnitus, you can use our treatment services at Tinnitus Cognitive Center. A session of TRT requires you to co-operate with a medical professional as only a specialist like Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW, can train your mind.

Such treatment uses counseling and sound therapy methods that spread over 1 to 2 years to tackle all three systems involved effectively. These include the auditory system, limbic system, and autonomic nervous system. Since tinnitus is a complicated symptom and condition, hearing centers offer special personalized treatments as per the specific requirements.

Best Retraining Therapy for Tinnitus
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How Does Tinnitus Retraining Therapy Work?

Tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT) can help minimize the symptoms of different types of tinnitus. These include regular tinnitus, pulsatile tinnitus, tinnitus that causes dizziness, and even bilateral and unilateral tinnitus.

TRT is a brilliant combination of three significant steps at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center. These are:

  1. Data collection: It is hard to identify the causes and prepare the perfect personalized treatment plan without enough patient data. First, we collect information regarding the patient’s medical history and daily lifestyle.
  2. Using sound therapy devices: Sound therapy mechanisms include masking, distraction, habituation, and neuromodulation, using various sound therapy devices. These help the patient’s brain ignore the intensity of tinnitus. The devices distract the patients’ attention from tinnitus sounds using external sounds.
  3. Psychological therapy: Psychological therapy is the main part of tinnitus retraining therapy that retrains the brain. This combines stress management tactics with relaxation exercises that help eliminate any anxiety and stress. As a result, patients stop perceiving tinnitus as a threat.

Tinnitus Retraining Therapy for Tinnitus: Conclusion

Tinnitus retraining therapy, as the name suggests, helps retrain the mind to minimize the intensity of tinnitus sounds. Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™, has 20 years of experience. He provides extensive, compassionate TRT to his patients.

Give us a call at 646-213-2321 to schedule an online session & consultation.

Ringing in the Ears: Is It Tinnitus?

Tinnitus is the sensation of hearing sounds without an external source. Although normally characterized by ringing in the ears, many people also experience buzzing, hissing, chirping, whistling, etc. The sound a person affected by tinnitus hears can vary greatly.

For example, some people may experience constant tinnitus while others suffer from intermittent ringing. Not only this, but people also experience different sounds at different volumes. On the other hand, some people experience pulsating ringing while it is steady for others. You can experience tinnitus in one or both ears or even inside your head.

Ringing in the Ears Is It Tinnitus?
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This common hearing condition affects around 50 million people in the US, particularly adults. Though not a serious health risk, it can often affect their quality of life. So, let’s see how you can find whether you have tinnitus. Then, you might need to see a medical professional for tinnitus treatment.

1.    Symptoms/ Causes/ Health Conditions

In case you’re wondering whether you’re suffering from tinnitus, start by evaluating the symptoms that you’re experiencing. Do you hear sounds that are not coming from your surrounding environment? If so, then what are the sounds like? People with tinnitus tend to hear multiple sounds ranging from ringing to humming.

Then, see where it’s taking place. Can you feel it in both your ears or just one of them? Are the sounds steady or pulsating? You might have pulsatile tinnitus if you experience a heartbeat in your ear in conditions with low background noise.

Also, evaluate the causes that might be contributing to the ringing sound in your ears. For example, conditions such as ear blockage, ear infection, Meniere’s disease, high blood pressure, and diabetes can trigger tinnitus. Certain medications and head and neck injuries can also largely contribute to the development of tinnitus.

Other health conditions associated with tinnitus include depression, sleeping problems, anxiety, hyperacusis, etc.

Ringing in the Ears Is It Tinnitus?
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2.    Frequency

The frequency of your symptoms plays a great role in determining whether or not you’re affected by tinnitus. Generally, most people experience tinnitus at some point when they are exposed to loud noise. For example, your ears might ring for a day or two after attending a concert. This suggests that tinnitus is usually not a serious health concern.

So, considering the frequency is an important factor. Try and notice how often you hear a noise in your head or ear(s). Or, does it only occur in certain conditions, such as while listening to music? Sometimes, the condition is only temporary, but it can also prevail for as long as over 15 years. So, it is important to identify if something specifically triggers tinnitus for you.

A specific situation like loud noise or a certain atmosphere causing tinnitus in your ears should not be problematic. However, treatment is necessary if you frequently experience symptoms of tinnitus. Tinnitus that prevails for longer than six months may be chronic, affecting the quality of life. Furthermore, it can also be a sign of nerve damage or a tumor.

3.    Influence

It is also important to consider how chronic tinnitus affects your life. It can largely affect your overall well being, mood, sleeping habits, ability to concentrate, etc. Tinnitus is also associated with psychological health conditions such as anxiety and depression. You can better assess your tinnitus situation by asking yourself the following questions:

  • Does your tinnitus affect how you enjoy your life?
  • Are you facing difficulty sleeping due to the constant ringing in your ears at night?
  • Do you find it hard to relax and stay calm because of tinnitus?
  • Does it interfere with your work life and overall productivity?

Ringing in the Ears is it tinnitus? Bottom Line

A hearing test can help if you have tinnitus symptoms for more than a few days after hearing a loud noise. If you’re looking to get your hearing checked, visit the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™. Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R, offers excellent tinnitus therapy to his patients. 

Give us a call today!

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
19 West 34th Street
Penthouse Floor
New York, NY 10001
646-213-2321

Latest Data on Tinnitus

What is some of the latest data on tinnitus? Many people, especially adults, experience the tinnitus symptoms. In fact, an estimated number of 3.4 million people suffer from tinnitus. Not to forget, 56.1 percent of these adults are experiencing tinnitus for more than 5 years. On the other hand, tinnitus is affecting the remaining for over 15 years.

Latest Data on Tinnitus
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While tinnitus can affect people of all ages, adults mostly fall victim to this hearing condition. You can notice a direct correlation between increased severity of symptoms and people over the age of 51. Let’s see what tinnitus really is and whether you need to see a doctor for your tinnitus.

What is Tinnitus?

Simply put, tinnitus is a hearing condition that affects a person’s ability to hear a sound that has no external source. Normally, we are able to hear and recognize sounds when a certain thing in our surrounding environment sends sound waves towards our eardrums.

However, people suffering from tinnitus can hear sounds that do not have an external source. Many people happen to hear a ringing sound in their head whereas others also experience sounds like roaring, chirping, hissing, whistling, and humming, etc.

If you’re suffering from tinnitus, you might hear such sounds in one or both your ears, or even inside your head. Some with tinnitus can hear a sound coming from a distance. The sound(s) can be intermittent, constant, or pulsating. In fact, the symptom can vary from person to person.

More often than not, symptoms of tinnitus are very subjective but it can also be objective at times. This means that other people are also able to hear your tinnitus with you. For example, you might be hearing a whooshing sound in case you have a heart murmur. So, your doctors can hear such tinnitus with the help of a stethoscope.

One common type of tinnitus is pulsatile tinnitus that normally affects older adults. Pulsatile tinnitus is characterized by a heartbeat in the ears that usually becomes more prominent and noticeable during the night. In case you experience pulsatile tinnitus in your bed at night, consult a doctor for a tinnitus checkup. This type of tinnitus in older people can also be a sign of blood vessel damage or even a tumor.

What Causes Tinnitus?

Although tinnitus can affect people for long periods of time, almost everyone experiences it at some point of their life. You may experience symptoms of tinnitus for a short time after you’re exposed to loud noise, like at a concert or a party. This type of short term tinnitus can go on for 2 to 3 days.

Latest Data on Tinnitus
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Other common causes for tinnitus are:

Hearing Loss

Your inner ears have small hair cells called cochlea that move when met with sound waves. As your ear receives sound waves and movement of cochlea takes place, ears send electrical signals along the auditory nerve towards your brain. You are finally able to hear when the brain interprets these signals. Tinnitus can be a symptom of hearing loss if you have a broken or bent cochlea.

Ear canal blockage or infection

Ear canal blockage and ear infection can both contribute to tinnitus. Cerumen or fluid buildup from an ear infection can block your ear canal creating pressure in your ear. As a result, you might experience symptoms of tinnitus.

Head and neck injuries

Oftentimes, an injury of the head or neck can damage your ear and associated parts and functions. It can affect your inner ear, brain function that is linked to hearing, and auditory nerves. Such injuries can lead to tinnitus, usually in one ear only.

Medications

Tinnitus can also be a result of certain medications. Various medications can trigger or worsen tinnitus, especially in case of high doses. These medicines normally include NSAIDs, diuretics, antibiotics, antidepressants, and cancer drugs.

Latest Data on Tinnitus: Bottom Line

Although tinnitus does not indicate a serious health risk in most cases, it can also be associated with nerve damage or tumor. Therefore, it is important to seek professional medical help if your symptoms of tinnitus prevail longer than a few days.

If you’re looking for the top tinnitus treatment specialist in New York, speak with  Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™. Dr. Katz possesses over 20 years of clinical patient experience and provides excellent Tinnitus Cognitive Retraining Therapy.

Call Dr. Katz and schedule an online tele-session today:

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
19 West 34th Street
Penthouse Floor
New York, NY 10001
646-213-2321

COVID and Tinnitus: Is There a Relationship?

Often referred to as ringing in the ears, tinnitus is another condition where research is needed to explore its relationship with COVID-19. As patients recover from the fatal viral infection, many report tinnitus symptoms. Although tinnitus is not directly considered a symptom of COVID-19, the post-COVID condition affects many patients.

COVID and Tinnitus Is There a Relationship?
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A systematic review regarding ear health symptoms of COVID suggests that nearly 15% of recovering patients experience tinnitus. While the connection between the two health conditions is still unclear, some factors can serve as clues. Continue reading to learn more about COVID and tinnitus and if the two are interlinked.

What is Tinnitus, Exactly?

Typically, tinnitus refers to a hearing condition in which an affected person hears sounds that do not exist around them. Some experts also describe it as a perception of sound that has no external source.

While ringing in the ear is the most common sound that most tinnitus patients experience, it can also be present in other sounds like buzzing, chirping, whistling, etc. In some rare cases, tinnitus can also occur in the form of music.

The unpleasant sensational hearing condition is extremely common worldwide, especially among older adults. Around 50 million adults suffer from tinnitus. According to various surveys, more than half of the adults suffering from tinnitus have done so for over five years. The timeframe for the disease shows that it is a chronic condition. Many conditions can trigger and worsen tinnitus; is COVID-19 one? We will discuss this further in this piece.

Not to mention, all humans experience short-term tinnitus at some point, according to the American Tinnitus Association. This is mostly due to exposure to loud noise. For example, you might experience tinnitus after attending a concert. In such cases, the condition should go away by itself, but you must seek medical help if tinnitus prevails for a long time.

Does COVID-19 Cause Tinnitus?

Many people still wonder whether tinnitus and hearing loss can be associated with COVID-19 and other viral infections. Let’s have a look at what we know.

Much remains undiscovered regarding the adverse effects of COVID-19 on human health. According to experts, COVID-19 does affect other organs of the body apart from the respiratory system.

COVID and Tinnitus Treatment
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For starters, SARS-CoV-2 can link to tinnitus and other hearing-related health issues. This is especially logical when the viral infection already causes so many symptoms affecting the upper respiratory system. This can especially put pressure on the ears and cause tinnitus. However, experts believe this is more likely the case with the Delta variant of COVID.

Nevertheless, patients have reported tinnitus as a symptom since the pandemic’s beginning. One group of researchers even looked into the matter to search for audio-vestibular symptoms of COVID. However, the results did not show any relation between tinnitus and severe acute respiratory syndrome.

But a return to the research in December 2020 revealed:

  • An estimated 7.6% of patients reporting hear loss
  • An estimated 14.8% of people report tinnitus
  • An estimated 7.2% of people reporting vertigo

This evidence suggests that COVID-19 can have a relationship with audio-vestibular conditions. The American Academy of Audiology, the Academy of Doctors Audiology, and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Associated revealed these statistics. Along with publishing the results, the study also conveyed the need for further studies that are yet to come.

COVID and Tinnitus: Conclusion

It is hard to confirm whether tinnitus is a direct symptom of COVID-19 infection but there sure is a connection between the two. This is evident in the high reporting rates. Regardless, tinnitus can be annoying and debilitating, so consulting a medical professional will help.

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
19 West 34th Street
Penthouse Floor
New York, NY 10001

Call today for a consultation
646-213-2321

Common Treatments for Tinnitus

What are some common treatments for tinnitus? Tinnitus is a hearing condition that affects millions of people all around the world. In the US alone, 50 million adults suffer from tinnitus. While tinnitus can affect people of all ages, it is most common among adults older than 50 years of age.

Common Treatments for Tinnitus

Moreover, adults usually experience the chronic form of tinnitus due to several aging related health conditions. In fact, various studies reveal that more than half of the adults affected by tinnitus have been experiencing tinnitus sounds for over 5 years.

Tinnitus Diagnosis and Treatment

Your medical professional will typically run a diagnosis based on your symptoms. However, tinnitus can also often be a sign of underlying health conditions. So your doctor might also conduct the following tests:

  • Hearing exam: Hearing loss is the most common cause of tinnitus, so a hearing test can help identify that.
  • Movement: Lips, tongue, or jaw disorders can also cause tinnitus. Movement tests can help identify underlying disorders that need treatment.
  • Imaging: If your doctor suspects a certain cause, they may need imaging tests such as CT or MRI scans.
  • Labs: Drawing and testing blood is essential to look for thyroid problems, anemia, or vitamin deficiencies.

Tinnitus treatment typically depends on the cause behind your tinnitus. Common treatments include:

  • Earwax removal: Cerumen (earwax) buildup can trigger tinnitus for many, so removal can prove significant.
  • Treating blood vessels: Damaged, bent or hardened vessels can lead to tinnitus in one or both ears. So, treatment of blood vessels can largely help address your tinnitus problem.
  • Hearing aids: Hearing aids may help if your tinnitus is a result of age related or noise induced hearing loss.
  • Changing medications: tinnitus can also often be a side effect of certain medications, such as cancer drugs. Changing the medication should ease tinnitus in such cases.

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Sound Therapy

There are four general mechanisms of sound therapy that work to suppress tinnitus sounds:

  • Masking: Masking is a form of sound therapy that uses sound maskers to cover up or ‘mask’ the sounds of tinnitus.
  • Distraction: Distraction uses pleasant external sounds to distract a person from tinnitus sounds.
  • Habituation: The practice of habituation trains the mind to disregard tinnitus sounds as unimportant noise.
  • Neuromodulation: Neuromodulation also makes use of specialized external sounds that rewire the brain to minimize neural hyperactivity.

Counseling

Counseling refers to behavioral treatment options that help affected people in coping and live with tinnitus. It seeks to change the way a person thinks about tinnitus, reducing anxiety and stress associated with stress. This way, tinnitus sounds no longer affect your productivity, mood, or concentration.

Best Common Treatments for Tinnitus

Common options include:

Tinnitus Retraining Therapy (TRT)

Tinnitus retraining therapy is a personalized treatment program that requires brilliant cooperation between a medical professional and the patient. TRT uses a combination of treatment methods such as sound therapies and counseling from trained professionals. Over time, tinnitus becomes less annoying and debilitating through tinnitus retraining therapy.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive behavioral therapy is another form of counseling that involves a licensed mental health professional helping you cope with tinnitus. The medical professional counsels and teaches techniques that can make the symptoms of tinnitus less noticeable and bothersome.

Common Treatments for Tinnitus: Conclusion

Tinnitus is a hearing related condition in which a person perceives sounds that do not exist in the external world. Constant ringing in the ears can have various adverse effects on the quality of life. So, seeking medical help can prove significant in enjoying life again.

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ in New York has over 20 years of experience in providing excellent TRT. Schedule a convenient online session with Dr. Katz today.

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
19 West 34th Street
Penthouse Floor
New York, NY 10001

Call today for a consultation
646-213-2321

Common Tinnitus Sounds

What are the most common tinnitus sounds? Many people around the world suffer from tinnitus, with 50 million adults in the US alone. Although people of different ages experience tinnitus at least once in their lifetime, it is most common in older adults. In fact, studies suggest that more than half of the affected people are adults over the age of 50. Not to mention, most of these people have suffered from this hearing condition for more than 5 years.

Common Tinnitus Sounds
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Let’s learn more about tinnitus and the most common sounds that tinnitus patients report hearing.

What is Tinnitus?

Tinnitus is a common hearing condition in which the affected person hears sounds without an external source. This means that the sounds an affected person hears do not actually exist in the external world. You might be suffering from tinnitus if you think you hear sounds that others around you don’t.

Different people experience sounds of different quality, types, frequencies, and degrees of loudness. While most people report ringing in the ears, others also complain about whistling, chirping, hissing sounds, etc. That is not all; the sounds can be all steady or pulsating and intermittent or constant.

Not to forget, people’s experiences of tinnitus also differ from one another in terms of where they feel the sound the most. Some people hear the tinnitus sounds inside their head, while another affected person might hear distant tinnitus sounds. Furthermore, tinnitus can be both bilateral (ringing in both ears) and unilateral (ringing in one ear only).

Typically, tinnitus is most common among people with hearing loss. However, the main cause of tinnitus is uncertain. Besides, tinnitus can also be a result of various health issues and other conditions such as:

  • Cancer or tumor
  • Certain medications
  • Jaw joint dysfunction
  • Wax buildup
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Chronic neck muscle strain
  • Head and neck injuries
  • Head and neck tumors and cancers
  • Benign cysts
  • Meniere’s disease

You might also experience tinnitus after being exposed to loud music. For example, attending a concert can trigger tinnitus for you. This should go away in a few days. However, treatment is necessary for tinnitus that prevails for long periods of time.

Types of Sounds

The experience of hearing tinnitus sounds varies from person to person. While some people experience one sound throughout their tinnitus, these sounds variably change and intertwine for others. People hear various sounds such as ringing, whooshing, sirens, static, roaring, pulsing, screeching, hissing, clicking, ocean waves, hissing, dial tones, etc. In rare cases, affected people also report hearing music and humming.

Each person experiences tinnitus differently with such a wide range of sound variety in tinnitus. At Tinnitus Cognitive Center, we understand that such differences require support, and we provide exactly that with our excellent treatment services.

Most Common Tinnitus Sounds Treatment
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Cases of tinnitus range from mild to severe, with people experiencing different intensities of sounds. Although the number of tinnitus sounds is uncertain, it largely depends on the type of tinnitus a person has.

The Four Different Types of Tinnitus based on Sounds

The four different types of sounds based on the variety of sounds are:

  • Subjective Tinnitus: The most common type of tinnitus, subjective tinnitus is usually a result of exposure to excessively loud noise. Generally, it may last for up to a year or even never stops in severe cases.
  • Neurological Tinnitus: Neurological Tinnitus is usually a symptom of other health disorders like Meniere’s disease. The latter affects the primary auditory functions of the brain.
  • Somatic Tinnitus: Somatic Tinnitus is associated with the body’s sensory system.
  • Objective Tinnitus: Objective Tinnitus is a rare type of tinnitus that is usually a result of vascular deformities or involuntary muscle contraction.

Common Tinnitus Sounds: Conclusion

Tinnitus sounds vary from person to person. However, they may depend on the four types of tinnitus: subjective tinnitus, neurological tinnitus, somatic tinnitus, and objective tinnitus.

If you think you might be experiencing tinnitus, you can visit us at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™ in New York. Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R has over 20 years of experience and provides effective tinnitus retraining therapy. Give Stephen Katz a call today to book an online session and begin relieving yourself of this condition.

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321

tinnituscognitivecenter.com

Stephen Geller Katz: Tinnitus Retraining Therapy

Tinnitus retraining therapy, or TRT, is rapidly becoming the most effective way to treat the sound disorder known as tinnitus. Currently, experts and scientists are busy searching for an effective permanent cure for tinnitus and associated sound disorders. While there are no instant cures for tinnitus, there are other remedial solutions that relate to medical treatments, counseling, and different forms of therapies. One of them includes tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT), which involves helping affected patients endure tinnitus noises and other symptoms.

Before we learn more about this treatment option, let’s understand tinnitus and its complications in a comprehensible manner.

Comprehending Tinnitus and it’s Complications

Tinnitus primarily refers to a sound disorder in which you experience constant ringing, or any other type of disturbing sounds, in your ears. This constant noise can occur in one year but most commonly affects both. Patients mention that they initially try to determine any external sources of these disturbing sounds and noises at which they absolutely fail.

Tinnitus Retraining Therapy Expert Inventor Katz

This is true, considering that the problem occurs internally. Tinnitus noises occur due to musculoskeletal and cardiovascular movements, which ultimately affect the ears, blood vessels, etc. Symptoms besides constant buzzing and ringing in the ears include:

  • Clicking
  • Whistling
  • Whooshing
  • Hissing
  • Humming
  • Roaring

Since there aren’t any external sources of sound near your head, experts regard these noises as “phantom sounds.” It can be disturbing and frustrating to experience constant noises in your ears without any prominent sound source. These can interfere with real interactions that involve making a speech, performing actions, and concentrating based on sound. Furthermore, people with persistent tinnitus suffer from anxiety, stress, and depression. While this condition can occur in anyone despite their age, gender, and underlying medical conditions, it is more prevalent in people of older age.

What are the Main Causes of Tinnitus?

Exposure to loud sounds consistently or in a sudden accident such as a blast, shatter, etc., can cause tinnitus

Auditory nerve tumors can result in tinnitus. This is when it affects the bones in the ear, mainly the middle ear area, which can adversely affect sound conduction.

Jobs that involve working with loud equipment or under loud environments can result in the manifestation of tinnitus. For example, those working as musicians, construction workers, and in other loud sound jobs are more susceptible to tinnitus.

Medications of certain types and makes can have a negative impact on the health of your middle and inner ears.

Some health conditions also cause and lead to tinnitus in one or both of the ears. Here are some:

  • Meniere’s disease
  • Blood pressure disorders
  • Cholesterol problems
  • Hearing loss
  • Temporomandibular Joint Disorders
  • Injuries to the neck, head, and ear

Tinnitus Retraining Therapy

Tinnitus retraining therapy is a common and highly regarded treatment option for tinnitus and its rare types. In simple words, tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT) is a habituation therapy that helps people cope with constantly disturbing noises such as ringing, buzzing, whooshing, etc. These sounds persist even when there is no external source for them. TRT involves directive counseling, which aims to help the patients regard tinnitus noises as neutral sounds/signals. Consequently, tinnitus-affected people are able to ignore the sounds.

Another important component of TRT is sound therapy, which involves masking and reducing the impact or awareness of tinnitus noises. Sound therapy introduces patients to various ear-related devices, such as hearing aids, white noise-reducing machines, brown noise-blocking machines, and other noise blockers. By reducing the noise level, you become less aware of the tinnitus issue. In reality, combining these two components (directive counseling and sound therapy) can result in an effective solution against tinnitus.

Tinnitus Retraining Therapy TRT Specialist Stephen Katz

Other Treatment Options for Tinnitus

Here are some other common treatments and remedial options that help lessen the impact and adversities of tinnitus in people.

Cochlear Implants

These aim to restore hearing function. These devices bypass the most damaged ear parts, allowing better hearing. It comprises an implanted microphone that goes over your ear. It has a set electrode in the inner ear, which helps conduct sounds and enables better hearing function.

These devices work primarily over electrical stimulation, which lets the brain interpret noises and sounds adequately. In short, cochlear implants are effective in producing electrical signals through the auditory nerves that your brain uses to process noises and sounds.

Lifestyle Improvement

You can try reducing stress levels to limit the occurrence of tinnitus noises or at least preventing them from worsening it. Stress doesn’t directly cause tinnitus but rather affects the way tinnitus noises occur. Therefore, too much stress can give rise to noises and worsen tinnitus.

Prescriptions/Medication

Certain types of medication are also effective in ruling out symptoms of tinnitus. Medication can help alleviate the effect and pain of tinnitus symptoms at the most.

Tinnitus Retraining Therapy: Conclusion

You can procure the best tinnitus retraining therapy at the hands of one of the top tinnitus treatment specialists in the USA.  Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™, helps patients in dealing with tinnitus, sound disorders, and misophonia.

Dr. Katz is a highly experienced expert in treating & in some cases curing tinnitus. Call to book an easy online session today.

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
646-213-2321


Reference Links

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25862626/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5562945/
https://www.medicinenet.com/ringing_in_ears/symptoms.htm
https://www.healthyhearing.com/report/52999-Tinnitus-sound-therapy-retraining-the-way-the-brain-perceives-sound

Tinnitus & Sound Disorders | Buzzing in the Ears

Tinnitus refers to a prevalent hearing disorder in which you hear strange and constant noises such as ringing, buzzing, whooshing, and so on in the ears. You might hear these strange, debilitating sounds constantly in one or both of your ears. However, you may not be able to find an external source for these sounds. This condition is “tinnitus.” Better known as “ringing in the year,” it occurs internally due to musculoskeletal or cardiovascular movement.

Tinnitus and Sound Disorders-Buzzing in the Ears

While these sounds cause you anxiety, depression, pain, and stress, people around you might not even get a hint of the sound. Experts refer to this type as “subjective tinnitus.” On the other hand, if people in close proximity to you can listen or feel the sound closely, experts call it “objective tinnitus.” Although it is usually a sign of aging, it can occur due to underlying serious medical issues as well.

Symptoms of Tinnitus and Sound Disorders

The most common symptom of tinnitus that many people mention is ringing in the ears. Nevertheless, there is a broad range of these strange noises and sounds that can affect your daily life. Here are some:

  • Roaring
  • Clicking
  • Whistling
  • Buzzing
  • Whooshing
  • Humming
  • Hissing

Normally, people affected with tinnitus experience the subjective type, in which they are the only ones who can hear these constant noises and sounds. These noises range between high and low in terms of pitches. Often, they may be as disturbing as a constantly high-pitched squeal. Therefore, you may understand how devastating their impact on a person’s lifestyle may be. The sounds can be loud enough to obstruct your concentration and rest. In some cases, they may interfere with your ability to hear external sounds.

Rare cases of sound disorders and tinnitus can result in whooshing and rhythmic pulsing noises. This occurs in a type of tinnitus known as “pulsatile tinnitus.” The noise, in this case, beats rhythmically with your pulse and may also be perceivable by another person examining you.

General Causes of Tinnitus and Sound Disorders | Buzzing in the Ear

There are various health conditions that experts believe lead to hearing loss and tinnitus alike. While there is no concrete evidence as to how these interconnect, they do affect tinnitus and worsen it in many cases. The general causes include:

  • Hearing loss: Cochlea deformity due to several medical reasons, including any accidents or injuries.
  • Ear infections: Probably due to ear wax buildup or bacteria accumulation that harms the health of the inner parts of one or both of your ears.
  • Medications: Specific medicinal drugs have a health effect that often impacts your ears’ inner condition adversely. Consulting your previous medications with your doctor can help to determine whether it is a cause of tinnitus in your ear.
  • Neck and head injuries: These pertain to damage to the internal sound-sensitive organs in one or both of your ears which results in hearing disability and tinnitus.

When is Immediate Medical Care Imperative?

You might not know when your hearing has worsened until you experience chronic symptoms. Speaking of sound disorders like tinnitus, you should know the right time to procure medical attention. While it is best to seek early treatments and diagnosis when experiencing acute to mild symptoms, you should seek medical care when the sounds become constant, high-pitched, frequent, and/or vary in pattern.

Furthermore, if tinnitus is starting to affect your daily life, such as when you are not able to comprehend external sounds, concentrate, or suffer from anxiety (or any other psychological issue), you should seek medical care.

In addition, if you feel dizzy, light-headed, or become depressed, you should immediately see a medical expert for quick treatment and long-term evaluation.

What Treatments are Available for Sound Disorders and Tinnitus?

Medication

Your doctor might prescribe antibiotic ear drops, anti-inflammatory pills/ear drops, and similar medication to help alleviate the discomfort and symptoms. Though, remember that tinnitus is mostly incurable, so you can’t expect the medication to cure it instantly. Aside from that, your doctor may also advise prescription drugs to counter anxiety and depression.

Buzzing in the Ears | Tinnitus Sound Disorders

TRT (Tinnitus Retraining Therapy)

TRT treatment works in conjunction with and presence of an audiologist who is an auditory expert. The main concept of this treatment method is to combine the most effective approaches: professional counseling and the use of sound-minimizing/masking devices along. The sound masking decreases your attention and bothersome awareness towards tinnitus noises, while the directive counseling helps you ignore them.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

CBT Therapy is also a form of counseling that requires a trained psychologist or similar professional. They help you define your thought process on tinnitus noises that leads to anger, anxiety, depression, and other effects. From then on, they help you construct a thought process of your own that is less bothered by tinnitus noises. Hence, you ignore the noises and perceive them as neutral sounds.

Buzzing in the Ears: Conclusion

Are you or a loved one currently experiencing tinnitus symptoms? If so, you should get in touch with Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™, who specializes in dealing with tinnitus and related health conditions.

Give us a call to set an appointment for an online consultation or treatment today. 

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
19 West 34th Street
Penthouse Floor
New York, NY 10001
646-213-2321

 


Reference Links:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/tinnitus/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20350162
https://www.nhsinform.scot/illnesses-and-conditions/ears-nose-and-throat/tinnitus
https://www.msdmanuals.com/home/ear,-nose,-and-throat-disorders/symptoms-of-ear-disorders/ear-ringing-or-buzzing
https://familydoctor.org/condition/tinnitus/

Ringing in the Ears: Do you Have Tinnitus?

If you struggle with the condition of a constant ringing sound in your ears, you already know that it can be annoying and frustrating. Although this ringing or buzzing in the ears is not a cause of concern most of the time, constantly experiencing it without any probable cause might require medical attention.

Ringing in the Ears | Tinnitus Treatment

Experts refer to this condition as “tinnitus,” whereas many people call it “a condition in which you hear ringing or buzzing noises in one or both of your ears”.

What is Ringing in the Ears (Tinnitus)?

Tinnitus is the occurrence of strange and obscure noises in your ears without a prominent cause. While we perceive sound normally through external sources, tinnitus is different. In this condition, the constant noise does not occur due to an external source. Rather, you hear noises because of an underlying internal issue. Still, you should not consider it more than sound disorder even though it is incurable most of the time.

Subjective tinnitus occurs when only the affected person can hear these strange and consistent noises in their ears. Conversely, objective tinnitus refers to when the people closely around the affected person may also perceive these sounds, but at a lower intensity. Note that objective tinnitus is rare and occurs in only 1% of all tinnitus patients. The noises are a result of musculoskeletal or cardiovascular movements within the body. Take a look at some of the general symptoms of tinnitus.

Symptoms

  • Roaring sounds
  • Whooshing sounds
  • Whistling noises
  • Hissing
  • Headaches
  • Sleep disturbance
  • Dizziness

What Leads to Ringing in the Ears (Tinnitus)?

For one, tinnitus may occur due to excessively loud sounds exposure. It is the case with most affected people and continues to persist. Moreover, it can cause noise-induced hearing impairment or even hearing loss. Loud sounds tend to destroy and adversely affect the condition of sound-sensitive cells in your ear’s cochlea, which is a spiral-shaped organ.

People who work jobs involving loud sounds or noises, such as musicians, construction workers, and factory workers, are at a higher risk of developing tinnitus. In addition, an abrupt exposure to loud noise can also manifest tinnitus in a healthy individual.

Health Conditions Leading to Tinnitus

Tumor if the auditory nerve

  • Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome affects the jaw, neck, and nearby areas of the ears
  • Ear clogs due to excessive wax buildup
  • Otosclerosis causes the small middle ear bones to become stiff
  • Menier’s disease leads to the deterioration of parts of the inner ear
  • Certain medications can harm the health of ears and their internal organs, so consult your healthcare provider to make sure don’t expose yourself to such threats
  • Neck and head accidents/injuries
  • Blood pressure disorders
  • Cardiovascular diseases and disorders
  • The aging process reflects poorly on the health of ears and the internal sound-sensitive cells and organs
  • Anemia, allergies, underactive or overactive thyroid gland, diabetes, etc.

Leaving the condition unaffected can lead to chronic progression of tinnitus, which may not be tolerable later on. Therefore, is best to seek medical attention to identify the underlying cause of tinnitus for effective treatment.

Tinnitus Ringing in Ears | Sound Disorder Treatment

What Treatments Might Help You with Ringing in the Ear (Tinnitus)?

Therapies

Therapies can help a patient with tinnitus feel less bothered or obstructed by the constant ringing or other forms of sounds. Therapies aim to establish a new thought process. They allow patients to view the symptoms of tinnitus from a different outlook. Hence, while they may not feel comfortable with the condition, they surely feel less concerned due to them.

Sound Therapies

There are various types of therapies that can help people with tinnitus enjoy their life and live with fewer disturbances. Sound therapy helps reduce the constant noise and sounds due to tinnitus. These therapies involve the use of sound devices that mask the constant ringing with external sounds. Such devices can include hearing aids, white noise machines, and masking devices.

However, the sound being external should be pleasant to hear. Otherwise, the whole purpose of it will remain unfulfilled. Furthermore, these therapies offer temporary relief. It means that once you take the devices off, tinnitus symptoms are bound to return.

CBT (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy)

While CBT doesn’t offer an outright solution to the tinnitus ringing and buzzing sounds, it offers comfort and relief with associated symptoms. CBT aims to reassure patients that tinnitus is a medical condition that doesn’t have a cure. By enhancing thinking and developing better behavioral patterns, an affected individual can learn to ignore these sounds.

TRT (Tinnitus Retraining Therapy)

TRT therapy involves perceiving the disturbing sounds and noises as normal. What does this mean? The therapy will involve the use of devices and trained professional’s advice to rethink the noises as normal external noises, which will help the patient cope with the severity and resume their daily life.

Ringing in the Ears & Tinnitus: Conclusion

If you aim to find the most effective tinnitus solutions and healthcare, you should get in touch with Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R at the Tinnitus Cognitive Center™. Dr. Katz is a world renowned tinnitus specialist who has successfully treated thousands of patients suffering from sound disorders such as tinnitus. Call Stephen today for a consultation and to schedule a convenient online session from anywhere in the world.

Tinnitus Cognitive Center™
Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R

19 West 34th Street
Penthouse Floor
New York, NY 10001

Call today for a consultation
646-213-2321

 

 


Reference Links:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/tinnitus-ringing-in-the-ears-and-what-to-do-about-it
https://www.healthline.com/health/tinnitus
https://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/tinnitus
https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/tinnitus-triggers

Tinnitus Cognitive Center

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R
19 West 34th Street
Penthouse Floor
New York, NY 10001


Call today for a consultation
646-213-2321